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IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

OF 

AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS 

AMES, IOWA 



THE GRADUATE DIVISION 

1915-1916 







i 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 

Vol H OCTOBER 10, 1915 No. 15 






ANNOUNCEMENT S. 



":. 



OF THE 



GRADUATE DIVISION 



AMES, IOWA 



Published Tri-Monthly by the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 
Entered as Second-class Matter, October 26, 1915, at the Post Office at Ames, Iowa, 
under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904. 



College Calendar 

1915-1916 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 10-11 — Registration of graduate students. 
September 13 — Instruction begins. 

November 24, 5 :00 P. M. — Thanksgiving vacation begins. 
November 29, 7:40 A. M. — Vacation closes. 
December 21, 5:00 P. M. — Christmas vacation begins. 
January 3, 1916, 7:00 P. M — Vacation closes. 
January 28, 5 :00 P. M. — College work closes. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 4-5 — Registration of graduate students. 

February 7 — Instruction begins. 

April 20, 5 :00 P. M. — Easter vacation begins. 

April 24, 7:00 P. M. — Easter vacation closes. 

June 7 — Alumni business meeting. 

June 8, 10:30 A. M. — Commencement. 

June 8, 1 :00 P. M. — Alumni and faculty banquet. 

SUMMER SESSION 

June 12 — Summer session begins. 

September 1, 5:00 P. M. — Summer session closes. 

FIRST SEMESTER, 1916-17 

September 15-16 — Registration of graduate students. 






Table of Contents 



PACK 
? 



College Calendar 

The College (Dii istons and Acth ities I 4 

Iowa State Board of Education 5 

Officers of Administration of the College 5 

Genera] Information 6 

General Statement 6 

Faculty 6 

ganization 7 

Aims and Methods 7 

Fees and Expenses 8 

Clubs and Societies 8 

Honorary Fraternities 9 

Admission and Degrees 9 

Master's Degree 10 

Master's Degree partly in Absentia 11 

Doctor's Degree 11 

System of Grading 12 

Professional Degrees 12 

Fellowships and Scholarships 13 

Departments Offering Graduate Instruction 14 

PAGE PAGE 

Agricultural Engineering 14 Forestry 22 

Agronomy 14 Geology 23 

Animal Husbandry 15 Home Economics 23 

Bacteriology and Hygiene 16 Horticulture 24 

Botany 16 Mathematics 25 

Ceramics 16 Mechanical Engineering 26 

Chemical Engineering 17 Mining Engineering 26 

Chemistry 18 Physics 27 

Civil Engineering 19 Structural Design 28 

Dairying 20 Veterinary Anatomy 28 

Economic Science 21 Veterinary Pathology 29 

Electrical Engineering 21 Veterinary Physiology 30 

Farm Management 22 Zoology 30 

Departments Offering Minor Work Only 30 

Agricultural Education 30 

Agricultural Journalism 31 

History 31 

Psychology 31 



The College 



The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts embraces 
the following divisions, and activities : 

The Graduate Division 

The Agricultural Division 

The Engineering Division 

The Industrial Science Division 

The Home Economics Division 

The Veterinarv Medicine Division 

The Agricultural Experiment Station 

The Engineering Experiment Station 

The Agricultural Extension Work 

The Engineering Extension Work 

The Summer Session 

The Sub-Collegiate Work 

The Short Courses 

Special announcements of the different branches of the work are sup- 
plied, free of charge, on application. The general college catalogue will 
be sent on request. 

Address, Herman Knapp, Registrar, 

Ames, Iowa. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

The laws of the State o\ [owa provide for the management and 
control of the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts by the 
Stale Board of Education. This hoard consists of nine men nominated by 
the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. This board appoints a finance 
committee consisting oi three men who give their entire time to the man- 
agement of the four state educational institutions of Iowa, under such 
rules and regulations as the State Hoard of Education may prescribe. 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

M EMBERS 

Hon. D. D. Murphy, President Klkader 

Hon. Frank F. Jones Villisca 

Hon. A. B. Funk Spirit Lake 

1 Ion. Geo. T. Baker Davenport 

Hon. Paul Stillman Jefferson 

Hon. Chas. R. Brenton Dallas Center 

Hon. P. K. Holhrook Onawa 

Hon. Edw. P. Schoentgen Council Bluffs 

Hon. H. M. Eicher Washington 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Hon. W. R. Boyd, President Cedar Rapids 

Hon. Thomas Lamhert Sahula 

Hon. W. H. Gem mill. Secretary Des Moines 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Jackson W. Bowdish, Auditor and Accountant Des Moines 

P. E. McClenahan, Inspector of Secondary Schools Des Moines 

John E. Foster, Assistant Inspector Des Moines 

Leslie I. Reed, Assistant Inspector Des Moines 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE COLLEGE 

Raymond Allen Pearson, M. S. in Agr., LL. D President 

Edgar Williams Stanton, M. S., LL. D. 

Vice-President, Secretary and Dean of the Junior College 
Charles Franklin Curtiss, M. S. A., D. S. 

Dean of the Division of Agriculture 

Anson Marston, C. E Dean of the Division of Engineering 

Charles Henry Stange, D. V. M. 

Dean of the Division of Veterinary Medicine 

Catharine J. MacKay Dean of the Division of Home Economics 

R. E. Buchanan, M. S.. Ph. D...Dean of the Division of Industrial Science 

Herman Knapp, B. S. A Treasurer and Registrar 

Thomas Sloss Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Mrs. Emily Cunningham Advisor for Women 

The College Faculty is composed of the president, deans, professors, 
associate professors, heads of the extension work and the advisor for 
women. 



Graduate Division 



President Raymond A. Pearson, Acting Dean 
GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts offers major 
and minor work for the degree of Master of Science in the following sub- 
jects with special application to the industries: agronomy, animal hus- 
bandry, bacteriology, botany, chemistry, dairying, economics, engineering, 
farm management, forestry, geology, horticulture, mathematics, physics, 
veterinary anatomy, veterinary pathology, veterinary physiology, and zool- 
ogy. Graduate instruction leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
is also offered in agronomy, animal husbandry, bacteriology, botany, chem- 
istry, dairying, geology, horticulture, and zoology. Additional minor sup- 
porting work is offered in other departments to supplement graduate study 
along technical lines. 

FACULTY 

The president, the deans, the heads of the departments in which grad- 
uate instruction is authorized, and other members of the faculties who are 
in immediate charge of graduate instruction are members of the Graduate 
Faculty. 




P^\*S,>^\£ 



Campus Drive 



GRADU \TK DIVISION 7 

ORGANIZATION 

The instruction and training of graduate students has been one of the 
functions of the Iowa State College since its early history. The first de- 
gree of Master of Science was conferred in 1877. In 1879 the first degree 
of Civil Engineer and the first degree of Master of Philosophy were con- 
ferred. In early years, the department or departments in which the 
student was registered mapped out the applicant's course and super- 
vised his work. Later, when the divisions of the College had been 
created, each division controlled its own graduate work. It was not 
long, however, until the number of graduate students and the diversi- 
fied character of their work demanded further organization, and a Gradu- 
ate Committee was appointed to supervise the work of all graduate stu- 
dents. This Committee was in charge until 1913 when the increase in the 
graduate work made it necessary to still further perfect the organization 
and the Graduate Division was established. The Graduate Division is ad- 
ministered by the President of the College as Acting Dean and the Grad- 
uate Faculty. Under this organization the graduate work to be pursued in 
any case is under the Acting Dean, the head of the department, and the 
professor in charge of the work. 

AIMS AND METHODS 

This is an age of great commercial, scientific, and social interests, and 
these interests are demanding greater economy, specialization in science, 
and more humanitarianism. To meet these demands the leaders in the 
different lines of industry, science, and social affairs must have access to 
more specialized training than can be secured in four years of study. 
The man who would be a successful competitor as an expert in any of the 
different lines of agriculture, or as a skilled chemist, engineer, botanist, 
bacteriologist, applied economic science expert, or as a teacher or inves- 
tigator in any of these subjects can by graduate training so increase his 
efficiency as to open up opportunities otherwise denied him. The develop- 
ment of scientific agriculture, engineering, manufacturing, and all the sup- 
porting sciences is dependent upon this training. A greater Iowa, econom- 
ically and socially, is impossible without it. The Iowa State College has 
long since realized its responsibility in the further development of the 
many lines of research work in harmony with the industrial needs of the 
commonwealth. 

Lectures, laboratory work, and seminar methods in which the student 
is in contact with his research problems are used in the development of 
the graduate work. The investigative work is shared by instructor and 
student, and the student acquires the spirit as well as the methods of pro- 
ductive work. To further encourage this spirit of research, provision has 
been made for the publication of specially meritorious work along some 
of the lines of investigation of which the institution has charge. 



8 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Incidental and Janitor Fee: The regular incidental and janitor fee 
for the semester is $12.00, but all students who classify during the classi- 
fication period, Friday and Saturday before College work begins, will be 
charged only $9.00 a semester. 

Laboratory Fees: Laboratory fees at the actual cost of breakage and 
usage are charged to students, the Treasurer's receipt for the fee being re- 
quired before the students are admitted to laboratories. Some fees rep- 
resent charges for mimeograph notes which are furnished at cost ; usually 
when these notes are supplied no text book is required and the fee is in 
lieu of text book purchase. Deposits are required in some departments to 
cover the value of equipment loaned to students, and at the end of the 
term the amount is returned less deduction for loss and breakage. For 
the amount of the fee in any study the student should refer to the descrip- 
tion of studies under the department in which the study is taught. 



Diploma Fee: 

$5.00. 



For the Master's, Doctor's, or Professional Degrees, 




Campus Scene 
CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 

In the interest of research and investigation along the lines of applied 
science and for training in the presentation of results, several clubs and 
societies have been organized by the instructors and students in the dif- 
ferent departments. Among these are the following : — 
Graduate Club. Iowa State College Branch of the 

Iowa Section of American Society American Institute of Electrical 

of Agronomy. Engineers. 



GF VDUATE DIVISION 9 

Botanical Seminar. Bacteriological Club. 

Physics Seminar. Chemical Seminar. 

Applied Social Science Club. 

HONORARY FRATERNITIES 

The following is a list of the Honorary Fraternities of Iowa State 

College, some oi which are maintaining regular programs along lines of 
research work : — 

Phi Lambda Upsilon. Gamma Sigma Delta. 

Phi Kappa Phi. Omicron Xn. 

Alpha Zeta. Delta Sigma Rho. 

Tau Beta Pi. 

ADMISSION AND DEGREES 

Graduates of Iowa State College, as well as graduates of other 
colleges and universities of approved standing, are admitted to the Gradu- 
ate Division. Before entering upon graduate work in any department. 
however, the applicant must present evidence that he has had the necessary 
prerequisite training that will enable him to pursue with profit the courses 
desired. It should be remembered, also, that admission to graduate work 
does not necessarily imply admission to candidacy for a degree. 

Admission to candidacy for an advanced degree is obtained by pre- 
senting an application, signed by the head of the department in which the 
major work lies, to the Dean of the Graduate Division to be allowed to 
become a candidate for the proposed degree. The applicant's general 
education, his proposed course of study, and his preparedness for the spe- 
cial work sought, will be considered before admitting him to candidacy. 

Graduate students who are not candidates for an advanced degree are 
not required to designate a major or minor subject but may elect their 
work with a view to their special purpose. Any course of study in the 
Graduate Division is open for election by such students upon the same 
conditions that are imposed upon those who are candidates for a degree. 
If at any time such special students desire to become candidates for an 
advanced degree, due consideration and credit will be given for work al- 
ready done. 

Upon initial classification the regular student must choose a major line 
of work. He obtains a registration card from the office of the Dean of 
the Graduate Division, presents this to the head of the department in which 
his major work is to be taken, and completes his classification in con- 
formity with the following rules : — 

1. From a minimum of 15 to maximum of 20 credit hours may be 
taken each semester. 

2. A major subject allowed by the rules of candidacy for the de- 
gree shall be chosen; all major, minor and supporting work shall be out- 
lined in consultation with the head of the department in which the major 
is taken. 

3. The courses of study as outlined shall be made out in triplicate: 



10 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

one shall be retained in the files of the department in which the major 
work is taken, one shall be filed in the office of the Dean of the Graduate 
Division, and one in the office of College Registrar. Each copy shall be 
signed by the head of the department in which the major work is taken, by 
the instructor who will have immediate charge of the major line of work, 
and by the Dean of the Graduate Division. 

4. The course of study as outlined shall not be amended or changed 

except by the approval of the Dean of the Graduate Division, the head of 

the department, and the instructor in immediate charge ; any such change 

shall be in writing and shall be filed with the original course of study. 

Note: Any deficiency in Modern Languages should be made up immediately. 
See requirements in Modern Languages for advanced degrees. 

The higher degrees conferred by the Iowa State College are the Mas- 
ter of Science and Doctor of Philosophy for advanced work in the tech- 
nical fields especially developed at this college; and the Professional De- 
grees of Civil Engineer (C. E.), Electrical Engineer (E. E.), Mechanical 
Engineer (M. E.), Engineer of Mines (E. M.), Ceramic Engineer (Cer. 
E.), Chemical Engineer (Ch. E.), Agricultural Engineer (A. E.), and 
Master of Agriculture (M. Agr.). 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREE 

The degree of Master of Science will be conferred upon students who 
have completed work in compliance with the following provisions and re- 
quirements : — 

1. One year must be spent in resident work. 

2. At least thirty credit hours or the equivalent must be completed, 
at least half of which should be from this institution. 

3. A minimum of twenty credit hours shall be completed in the 
major work. Minor work is optional with the department, but it is recom- 
mended. Not more than ten hours of minor work will be credited toward 
the advanced degree. 

4. A satisfactory reading knowledge of French or German must be 
certified to by the Head of the Department of Modern Languages prior 
to admission to examination. Upon the recommendation of the head of 
the department some other modern language may be substituted for French 
or German. 

5. Only such subjects as are designated as "undergraduate and grad- 
uate" or "graduate" will be credited toward the advanced degree. Major 
work will ordinarily be restricted to graduate subjects. 

6. Thesis is optional with the department in which the major work 
is taken. 

7. Examination shall be taken on all graduate work including thesis 
when this is required. This shall be oral or written as determined by the 
instructors concerned. 



GR \IH' \TK DIVISION 



11 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREE PARTLY 
IN ABSENTIA 

Any graduate of Iowa State College or other institution of high stand- 
ing may he permitted to do one-half the required work for the Master's 
Degree in absentia as follows: 1. The applicant must be in residence at 
this institution during at least three six-weeks summer sessions. 2. Dur- 
ing the period of two consecutive years while not in residence at the Col- 
lege the candidate must pursue a course of advanced study previously ar- 
ranged by the head of the department in which the work is to be done and 
which has been approved by the Dean of the Graduate Division. This 
absentia work is expected to equal in amount that normally accomplished 
in three six-weeks summer sessions and is to lie along the line of his major 
work. Such special students are required to pass examinations on all 
work done at the College and in absentia. 




Along Squaw Creek 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCTOR'S DEGREE 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy will be conferred upon students 
who complete work in compliance with the following provisions and re- 
quirements : — 

1. Three years of graduate work are required, one of which must be 
spent at this institution. At least ninety credit hours or the equivalent 
shall be passed. 

2. The degree will be conferred not solely as a result of a faithful 



12 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

study over any period, but for ability to do research work of a scholarly 
character and the successful passing of all examinations. 

3. Major work shall be taken in one subject, or, in exceptional cases, 
in two closely related subjects. Two minors shall be taken when only one 
major is chosen, and one minor shall be taken when two majors are chosen. 

4. Minor work shall represent from one-fourth to one-third of the 
work for the degree. 

5. One minor must be taken outside the department in which the 
major is taken. 

6. A reading knowledge of French and German must be certified to 
by the Head of the Department of Modern Languages at least one year 
prior to final examination. 

7. During the last two years of graduate work only such courses as 
are designated as "graduate" shall be credited on major w T ork. 

8. A thesis which is a real contribution to knowledge along some line 
in which the major is taken must be completed. 

9. Not later than April 1st of the academic year in which the degree 
is sought, the candidate shall have his thesis approved by the head of the 
department in which the major work has been taken and submitted in 
typewritten form to the Dean of the Graduate Division, who shall refer it 
to a committee for the purpose of final approval. 

10. Publication of the thesis by the candidate or by a scientific journal 
is required. In either case the degree will not be conferred until two type- 
written copies of the thesis have been deposited in the library and a finan- 
cial guarantee that fifty printed copies in approved form will also be de- 
posited in the library. 

11. The Dean of the Graduate Division shall appoint for each candi- 
date an examining committee composed of five members, including the 
professors in charge of the major and minor work, the chairman of which 
shall be the professor in charge of the student's major work. The Dean 
shall also designate the time and place for the examination, which may be 
either oral or written or both, over the fields of the major and first minor. 
In case a second minor is chosen, the examination over it may be waived 
if the candidate's standing in it is satisfactory. 

SYSTEM OF GRADING 

Grades, when possible, are reported to the Registrar in per cent. When 
percentages are impossible, grades are reported as passed (P), or failed 
(F), together with the number of credit hours. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

In Engineering the requirements may be met in any one of the three 
following ways : — 

1. Graduation from a regular four-year course in engineering, one 
year of resident study approved by the engineering faculty, at least one 
year of experience in a responsible professional position, and the prepara- 
tion of a satisfactory thesis. 

2. Graduation from a regular four-year course in engineering, at 



GRADUATE DIVISION 13 

least five years of experience in a responsible professional position, and the 
preparation of a satisfactory thesis. 

3, Graduation from a regular five-year course in engineering, at least 
one year of successful professional experience, and the preparation of a 
satisfactory thesis. 

In Agriculture the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricul- 
ture are as follows: Graduation from a standard collegiate course in 
agriculture, at least five years successful experience in some phase of prac- 
tical or professional agriculture, and the presentation of an acceptable 
thesis. 

In Agriculture and Engineering the requirements for the degree of 
Agricultural Engineer are the same as those for the Professional En- 
gineering degrees, except that the candidate must be recommended by the 
faculties of both the Agricultural and Engineering Divisions. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

For the promotion of educational efficiency the Board of Education has 
established at Iowa State College a system of fellowships and scholarships. 

Scholarships are given to holders of a baccalaureate degree and carry 
with them a stipend of two hundred dollars payable in ten equal payments 
with the remission of tuition. All scholars pay laboratory fees, a two 
dollar hospital fee, and a fee of one dollar for each hour's work up to 
seven hours. Scholars are required to do three hours teaching a week 
or the equivalent. 

Teaching Fellowships are open to graduates of reputable institutions 
and carry with them a stipend of four hundred dollars with the remission 
of tuition. Teaching Fellows are required to do five hours of teaching a 
week or its equivalent. The fees for Fellows are the same as those for 
Scholars. 

Junior and Senior Research Fellowships are open to graduates of 
reputable institutions and have for their object the encouragement of re- 
search work. Junior Research Fellowships may be held during the first 
year of graduate study and carry with them a stipend of three hundred 
dollars with the remission of tuition. Senior Research Fellowships carry 
with them a stipend of five hundred dollars and are ordinarily not award- 
ed except to those who have had at least one year of graduate study or 
research experience. Research Fellows in the experiment stations shall 
observe experiment station hours throughout the college year, except for 
the time given to minor work. The fees for all Fellows are the same as 
those for Scholars. 

Full resident credit may be given for graduate work to holders of 
scholarships, and of teaching and research fellowships. 

Note: The members of the institutional and investigational force of rank of 
instructor or assistant are permitted to do graduate work. Those on half time em- 
ployment may receive not to exceed two-thirds time credit, and those on full time 
may receive not to exceed one-fourth time credit. All adjustments as to the amount 
of credit to be allowed shall be made between the Head of the Department in which 
the work is taken and the Dean of the Graduate Division. 



14 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENTS OFFERING GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 
Agricultural Engineering 

Professor Davidson; Associate Professor Costelloe; Assistant Professor 

Mervine 

The department offers major work for the degree of Master of Science 
in Agricultural Engineering along the lines of farm machinery, farm 
power, drainage, irrigation, rural sanitation, and farm structures ; and 
minor work for students selecting major work in other departments. 

The equipment of the Department of Agricultural Engineering is very 
complete. The department occupies the two lower floors of Agricultural 
Engineering Hall and the Agricultural Engineering Annex and has a large 
garage, shops, and well equipped laboratories with the best modern farm 
machinery. 

The farm machinery equipment includes samples of steam, gasoline, 
and oil tractors, one I H C auto-wagon, one Avery three-ton truck, one or 
more samples of most every kind of the important field and power ma- 
chines. The department has several special dynamometers, the use of 
fourteen modern engines of different types with indicators and testing ap- 
paratus, a 750 watt gasoline-electric plant and two complete aceylene light- 
ing plants to add to the usefulness of the laboratory. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Farm Machinery; Farm Motors; Rural Sanitation; Farm Structures; Drainage 
Engineering; and Irrigation. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Agricultural Engineering 
see page 12. 

Agronomy 

Professors Stevenson, Hughes, Brown; Associate Professor Smith; As- 
sistant Chiefs Potter, Burnett 

Graduate work in agronomy comprises investigations in the two gen- 
eral fields of soils and of farm crops. Major and minor work for the 
Master's Degree is offered along the lines of crop production, plant 
breeding, soil physics, soil fertility, soil bacteriology, soil humus, and soil 
management. For the' Doctor's Degree, major and minor work is of- 
fered in soil fertility, soil bacteriology, and soil humus. 

In order to register for graduate work in agronomy, a student must 
have obtained his baccalaureate degree from an institution of recognized 
standing 

The Department of Agronomy has eight commodious and well equip- 
ped soil laboratories for scientific work ; suitable greenhouses and field 
plots for study and experimentation ; and valuable data secured from ex- 
tensive soil experiments ; photographs, charts and maps which serve the 
needs of advance students. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Special Problems in Production and Breeding of Farm Crops; Methods of Crop 
Investigation; Experimentation Methods and Work; Judging; Small Grain and Forage 
Crops; Research in Plant Breeding; Research in Crop Production; Research in Soil 
Physics; Research in Soil Management; Soil Bacteriology; Research in Soil Bacteri- 
ology; Research in Soil Humus. 



GR \1>1'.\TK DIVISION 



IS 




Agricultural Hall 



Animal Husbandry 

Professors Pew, Kildee, Turpin; Associate Professors Vaughn, Lloyd- 
Jones, Shearer, Ferrin; Assistant Chief Evvard 

The department offers major and minor work for Master's Degree 
along the lines of animal nutrition and feeding, animal breeding, live stock 
management, dairy husbandry, and poultry husbandry, and major and 
minor work for the Doctor's Degree along the lines of nutrition and 
breeding. 

The student who elects animal breeding as his major is expected to 
choose some subject for his thesis which will come under any one of the 
various lines of work mentioned above. This subject must be thoroughly 
investigated and a suitable thesis written. He must also choose a minor 
subject and elect supporting courses. 

The equipment of the Animal Husbandry Department consists of an 
excellent collection of horses representing all of the market classes and 
breeds of both light and heavy types, among which are the Shires, Perch- 
erons, Clydesdales, Standard breds, and American saddle horses ; two 
hundred head of cattle, representing all of the leading beef, dual-purpose, 
and dairy breeds, among which are seventy representatives of the Hol- 
steins, Jerseys, Guernseys, Ayrshires, with good sires of the different 
breeds; two hundred head of seven different breeds of sheep; six breeds 
of the best American and British varieties of swine ; herd books ; photo- 
graphs, charts, and lantern slides ; a well equipped twenty-acre poultry 
farm ; and a two hundred acre dairy farm. 

The following lines of study are open to graduates : — 

Live Stock Production, Breeding, Feeding, Management, and Judging; Milk and 
Wool Production; Animal Nutrition; Market and Breeding Types of Poultry; and 
Research, 



16 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Bacteriology and Hygiene 

Professors Buchanan, Brown; Associate Professors Murray, Hammer; 
Assistant Professor Levine 

Major and minor work leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy are offered in the following lines : household 
bacteriology and zymotechnique, general and systematic bacteriology, dairy 
bacteriology, sanitary bacteriology, soil bacteriology, and veterinary and 
pathogenic bacteriology. 

The student who elects his major in any field of bacteriology should 
present undergraduate credits in organic chemistry, one semester of phys- 
ics, the equivalent of Course 1 in Bacteriology, and an elementary course 
in the line in which he expects to major. Ordinarily a student must do 
two-thirds of his work in one of the lines of bacteriology above mentioned. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

General Bacteriology; Advanced Bacteriology; General and Pathogenic Bacteri- 
ology; Seminars; Bacteriology of Pathogens; Special Poultry Bacteriology; Immunity 
and Serum Theraphy; Dairy Bacteriology; Research in General and Systematic Bac- 
teriology; and Research in Dairy Bacteriology. 

Botany 

Professor Pammel ; Associate Professor Martin ; Assistant Professor 

Bakke 

The student who elects botany as a major for the degree of Master of 
Science will be required to take as his major at least twenty credit hours 
from the subjects designated as "graduate." The minor work may be 
selected from the subjects designated as "undergraduate and graduate." 

For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy the student should have all 
of the strictly undergraduate work in botany given elsewhere in the cata- 
logue and at least sixty hours of major graduate work in botany covering 
the various lines of morphology, physiology, taxonomy, pathology, and eco- 
nomic botany ; and minor work along the collateral lines related to botany. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Plant Embryogeny; Botany of Weeds; Evolution of Plants; General and Experi- 
mental Morphology; Methods of Histology; Cytology and Methods of Histology; 
Physiology, Ecology, Agrostology ; Systematic Botany; Dendrology; Mycology; Veg- 
etable Pathology; Range and Poisonous Plants; Botanical Seminars; Cytology; Ad- 
vanced cource in Thallophytes; Applied Botany; Microscopical Examination of Foods; 
Seed Testing; Poisonous Plants; and Research. 

Ceramics 

Professor Beyer; Associate Professor Staley; Assistant Professor Galpin 

The department offers major and minor work for the degree of Master 
of Science along the lines of ceramic technology of crude and fine clay 
products, the technology of glass and enamel making, the geology of clays 
and ceramic materials, microscopic study of clays, and ceramic materials 
and cement making. 

The Department of Ceramics maintains a clay working laboratory 
equipped with up-to-date machinery; kiln rooms with both an up-and 
down-draft experimental kiln using solid fuel, and a pottery kiln in which 



GR \IH' \TK DIVISION 



17 




A Famiuar Walk 

oil is burned ; a drying and physical testing room with all the necessary 
utensils for making up and testing clays and other ceramic materials; 
and a gas and fuel testing room equipped with an improved Elliott ap- 
paratus for gas analysis, a Parr calorimeter for solid fuels, a Junker 
calorimeter for gas and oils, Le Chatelier electric, a Wanner optical, and 
a Brown metallic pyrometer. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Ceramic Lectures; Ceramic Design; Special Problems; and Research in the above 
lines of work. 

For the professional degree of Ceramic Engineer see page 12. 



Chemical Engineering 

Professors Beyer, Coover; Associate Professor Gabriel 

Students majoring for advanced degrees in other departments of the 
Engineering, Industrial Science, and Agricultural Divisions may minor in 
chemical engineering. At the present time the department is not offering 
all of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science. 

The Chemical and Engineering Departments are provided with facil- 
ities for investigation of manufacturing problems and for conducting in- 
dustrial research according to a practical system of cooperation between 



IK 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



science and industry. These facilities are open to graduate students in 
chemical engineering. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Industrial Chemistry; The Chemistry of the Manufacture of Foods; Chemical 
Machinery; Applied Electrochemistry; Municipal Chemistry; and Research in .Manu- 
facturing Problems. 

For the professional degree of Chemical Engineer see page 12. 



■ • 







mnnsBHi 




III 



Chemistry Building 



Chemistry 

College Department Staff: Professor Coover; Associate Professors Fow- 
ler, Gabriel, Test, Wilkinson, Renshaw. Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station Staff: Chief Dox. Engineering Ex- 
periment Station Staff: Chief Cove. 

The Chemistry Department offers major and minor work for Master's 
Degree along the lines of agricultural, analytical, household, industrial, ap- 
plied inorganic, applied organic, applied physical, and physiological chem- 
istry and nutrition. For the Doctor's Degree the department offers work 
for a minor in the above subjects, and for a major along the lines of agri- 
cultural, applied organic, applied physical, and physiological chemistry and 
nutrition. 

The student entering upon graduate work in chemistry must have 
completed a course in general and inorganic chemistry, qualitative and 
quantitative analysis, and organic chemistry equivalent to those given in 
an approved college or university. He must also have completed the ele- 
mentary courses given by the department along the line in which he wishes 
to major. 

In the Agricultural Experiment Station thesis work is offered in agri- 



GRADUATE D1VISK >.\ 



19 



cultural and biological chemistry. In the Engineering Experiment Station 
thesis work is offered in industrial chemistry and the chemistry of road 
materials. 

The following studies are open to graduates: — 

Inorganic Chemistry; Research in Applied [norganic Chemistry; Qualitative and 
Quantitative Analysis; Research in Analytical Chemistry; Applied Physical Chemistry 
Electro-chemistry; Research in Applied Physical Chemistry; Analysis of Carbon Com 
pounds; Manufacture of Pine Organic Chemicals: Applied Organic Chemistry; Re 
search in Applied Organic Chemistry; Food Analysis; Research in Food Analysis 
Hairy Chemistry; Sanitary Chemistry ; Agricultural Chemistry; Research in Agricul 
tural Chemistry; Physiological Chemistry; Research in Metabolism; Industrial Chem 
istry; Chemical Machinery; and Municipal Chemistry. 

Civil Engineering 
Professors Kirkham, King; Associate Professors Evinger, Crum, Agg 
The department offers major work for the degree of Master of Sci- 
ence in Civil Engineering along the lines of masonry structures and ex- 
perimental engineering, railway engineering, structural engineering, hy- 
draulic and sanitary engineering, masonry design, highway engineering; 
and minor and supporting work in the other departments of the Engineer- 




II 

1 1 1| 




■;■;. ,,,,: .-•;, " 



Engineering Hall 



ing, Agricultural, and Industrial Science Divisions. Students may there- 
fore major in civil engineering and minor in any department of the Agri- 
cultural and Industrial Science Divisions which offers a correlated line 
of work, and vice versa. 

The Departmental of Civil Engineering occupies nine rooms in the 
Engineering Hall, eight rooms in the Structural and Hydraulics Labora- 
tory, four rooms in the Engineering Annex, and the entire Transportation 
Building. Included within the eleven engineering buildings there are the 
following laboratories and drafting rooms : the cement laboratory ; the 



JO 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



the structural materials laboratories ; the hydraulics laboratory ; laboratory 
for testing non-bituminous road materials ; the bituminous materials labora- 
tory; and six large drafting rooms. The equipment for advanced work 
in these laboratories is of the best on the market and is sufficient to ac- 
commodate many graduate engineering students. 
The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Water Purification; Sewage Treatment and Municipal Wastes Disposal; Elements 
of City Planning; Seminars; Water Supply; Railway Design; Railway Operation; 
Advanced Structural Engineering; Road Materials; Experimental Work in Civil En- 
gineering; Masonry Design; Highway Engineering; Roads and Pavement Design; and 
Railway Engineering. 

For the professional degree of Civil Engineer see page 12. 




Dairy Building 



Dairying 

Professor Mortensen ; Associate Professor Hammer; Assistant Professor 

Rudnick 

The Dairying Department offers major work for the Master's Degree 
along the lines of butter making, ice cream making, factory management, 
and dairy bacteriology; and minor work in butter making, ice cream mak- 
ing, factory management, dairy bacteriology, market milk, cheese making, 
milk technology, testing milk and its products. 

The department also offers (in correlation with the fundamental sci- 
ences) major work for the Doctor's Degree along the lines of factory 
management and dairy bacteriology ; and minor work in butter making, ice 
cream making, factory management, dairy bacteriology, market milk, cheese 
making, milk technology, and testing milk and its products. 

The Dairy Department occupies the entire four-story dairy building, 
which contains the different laboratories which are equipped for scientific 
investigation in any of the above lines of work. Graduate students seeking 
degrees in Dairying are supposed to be well prepared in the fundamental 
sciences offered in the Industrial Science Division. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Factory Management; Fancy Ice Creams and Ices; Judging Dairy Products; Milk 
Testing and Inspection; Seminars; Market Milk; and Research in Dairy Bacteriology, 
Ice Cream Making, Butter Making, and Creamery Management. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 21 

Economic Science 

APPLIED ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Brindley; Associate Professor Von Tungeln; Assistant Profes- 
sor Ise 

Major work loading to the degree of Master of Science may be taken 
in any of the specialized fields: agricultural economics, engineering eco- 
nomics, or applied sociology. 

The student taking major work in applied economics and social science 
should take supporting work in history and psychology and in agriculture, 
engineering, or home economics. 

The following studies are open to graduates: — 

American Labor; Highway Economics; Seminars; Marketing Agricultural Pro- 
ducts; Railway Transportation; Research in Public Utilities; State Regulation of In- 
dustries; Agricultural Credit and Applied Sociology; Rural Law; Veterinary Law; 
Business Law; Auditing and Accounting; Rural Statistics; Rural Sociology; Research. 

Electrical Engineering 

Professor Fish; Associate Professor Bartholomew; Assistant Professors 

Robbins, Paine 

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers opportunity for 
major work leading to the degree of Master of Science in Electrical En- 
gineering. The subjects offered are advanced theory of alternating cur- 
rents, electric power transmission, electric railways, and advanced work on 
the operating characteristics of electrical apparatus. 

Opportunity for minor work is also given to those majoring in other 
departments of Engineering and in the departments of the Industrial Sci- 
ence and Agricultural Divisions. 

The department has its offices in the Engineering Hall and the En- 
gineering Annex. The Engineering Annex also contains the electrical 
laboratory with twenty-eight generators and motors of various manufac- 
ture, several transformers, over one hundred accurate instruments, mount- 
ed lamp banks, rheostats, choke coils, and other apparatus. A substation 
motor-generator set, which has a 100 horse-power, three-phase, 60 cycle, 
1100-volt. 12C0-r. p. m. induction motor takes power from the College 
central power plant. To one end of the motor is coupled a 60-kilowatt, 
125-volt, compound wound, direct-current generator and to the other end 
is coupled a 50-kilowatt, three-phase, 60-cycle 220 and 110-volt alternator. 
The various experimental machines consist of shunt, series, interpole, 
and compound wound generators and motors, alternating current synch- 
ronous and induction motors, revolving field alternators, and double cur- 
rent generators. Individual switchboards are mounted with instruments 
and control apparatus for student use. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Principles of Electrical Engineering; Direct and Alternating Current Machinery; 
Seminars; and advanced work in the studies above mentioned. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Electrical Engineer, see 
page 12. 



22 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Farm Management 

Professor Munger; Assistant Chief Lloyd 
Major and minor work leading to the Master's Degree is offered by 

the department in farm management, including studies of farm tenancy, 

cost of production and farm practice. 

Students who major in this department must have a baccalaureate 

degree in farm management from an institution of recognized standing. 
The following studies are open to graduates : — 
Research in Farm Tenancy and Cost of Production; Thesis; and Seminars. 




The; Willows 



Forestry 

Professors Beach, MacDonald; Associate Professor Morbeck 
The department offers a five year course leading to the degree of 
Master of Science in Forestry, and major and minor work for the Mas- 
ter's Degree along the lines of forest protection, forest management, 
lumbering, and forest products. 

The student entering upon the work for an advanced degree must 
have completed the equivalent of the four year course in forestry. 

Forestry is housed in Agricultural Hall where laboratory and class 



GRADUATE DIVISION 23 

room space is afforded. The museum contains the collection of American 
woods which was exhibited by Iowa at the Centennial exposition; a large 
collection o\ South American and Philippine Island woods which were 
on display at the Louisiana Purchase exposition; a large number of trunk 
specimens of trees; and about 800 lantern slides. The College has a 100- 
acre woods tract which serves as a demonstration area and 150 different 
species o\ trees are found on the campus. 

The following studies are open to graduates: — 

Advanced Forest Management; Advanced Forest Regeneration; Forestry Re- 
search; Wood Structure: Grading Lumber; and Forest Protection. 

Geology 

Professor Beyer; Assistant Professor Galpin 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's Degree 
along the lines of mining geology, glaciology, paleontology, economic 
geology, and petrology. The department also offers graduate work lead- 
ing to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy along the lines of economic 
geology and petrology. 

Those who elect geology as a major for an advanced degree must have 
completed a course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in geology 
in a standard institution. 

The museum contains several selected series of fossils, minerals, rocks 
and ores, from the different sections of the United States. Among these 
are the series of rocks collected by the United States Geological Survey; 
the series of rocks and minerals collected by the Smithsonian Institution ; 
the Calvin series of paleozoric fossils ; the Coastal Plain fossils from New 
Jersey, Alabama, Maryland and Virginia ; The English mineral collection ; 
the Permo-Carboniferous series from Kansas and Russian, and from the 
coal plants of Iowa, Illinois, and Pennsylvania; a large series of lead and 
zinc ores from the different fields in the United States; and the Dr. H. 
Foster Bain series of rocks and minerals. 

The laboratory is equipped for scientific study in the lines in which 
major work is offered. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Invertebrate and Vertebrate Paleontology; Paleo-Botany ; Special Paleontology; 
Petrology; Optical and Physical Mineralogy; Petrography; Topographic and Geologic 
Mapping and Economic work; Economic Geology; Strategraphic Geology; and Car- 
tography. 

Home Economics 

Professor MacKay ; Associate Professors Russell, Gettemy, Monsch ; As- 
sistant Professor Schermerhorn 

The department offers minor work for the Master's Degree along the 
lines of dietetics, theory of practice, sewing, and applied art. The de- 
partment offers no major work for the Master's Degree, but a student with 



24 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 




Margaret Hall 

a major in any department of the Industrial Science Division may minor 
in Home Economics. 

The department occupies the entire three story Home Economics Build- 
ing and it has had, during the past year, nearly six hundred students. 

The studies which may be chosen as minors in graduate work are : — 
Nutrition and Dietetics; Theory' and Practice of Teaching Heme Economics; Ad- 
vanced Dressmaking; Millinery; Costume and Textile Design; Home Architecture and 
Sanitation; and History of Art. 



Horticulture 

Professor Beach; Chief Erwin; Assistant Professor Culley 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's Degree 
along the lines of general horticulture, pomology, truck crops, landscape 
gardening, and floriculture; and major and minor work for the Doctor's 
Degree along the lines of plant breeding and pomology. 

The student who elects horticulture as his major is expected to have 
taken as undergraduate work the equivalent of either a pomology 01 a 
gardening course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Horticul- 
ture in a standard institution. 

To aid in a practical and scientific study the department has on the 
large campus, orchards, nurseries, vineyards, gardens and a well equipped 
fruiticetum. A twenty-three acre orchard and station at Council Bluffs 
are used by the department also. The department has a large and well 
equipped plant laboratory building together with new green-houses with 
about 30,000 feet under glass. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

I'lant Breeding; Research in Plant Breeding; Fruit Farm Management; Advanced 
Floriculture ; Markel Gardening; Research in Pomology, and Truck Crops. 



GP \hl\\TK DIVISION' 



25 




t&m*am,\k 



E Foot of the Knoel 



Mathematics 



Professors Stanton, Roberts; Associate Professors Colpitts, Pattengil 
Chaney, Snedecor; Dr. Tappan 



Students who elect mathematics as major work for an advanced de- 
gree are supposed to have taken a bachelor's degree in mathematics from a 
recognized institution. 

Major and minor work for the degree of Master of Science is offered 
by the Department of Mathematics. Special courses in advanced mathe- 
matics of engineering, physics, insurance and economic problems, statistics, 
and biological problems are offered by the department and so correlated 
with the technical lines of work as to demand consideration of all students 
who expect to teach applied mathematics in technical institutions or to be- 
come investigators in any of the above lines of work. 

By special arrangements students majoring in mathematics may minor 
in engineering, physics, chemistry, or any of the biological sciences, if the 
work in such sciences is mathematical in character. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Theory of Equations; Determinants and Advanced Analytic Geometry; Advanced 
Spherical Trigonometry; History of Mathematics; Advanced Differential and Integral 
Calculus; The Theory of Functions; Differential Equations; Projective Geometry; 
Higher Algehra; Infinite Series; Mathematical Theory of Statistics; Mathematics as 
Applied to Economic Problems; Theoretical Mechanics; Theory and Applications of 
Vector Analysis; Advanced Dynamics; Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics; 
and the Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. 



26 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Mechanical Engineering 

Professor Meeker; Associate Professors Cleghorn, Major, Norman, 

Porter 

The department offers major work for the degree of Master of Sci- 
ence in Mechanical Engineering along the lines of gas engineering, steam 
engineering, heating and ventilation, machine designing, railway mechanical 
engineering, automobile engineering : and minor and supporting work in 
the other departments of the Engineering, Agricultural, and Industrial 
Science Divisions. 

The general offices of the department are in the Engineering Hall. 
The lecture and drafting and blue-print rooms are in the Engineering Hall 
and Engineering Annex. The department occupies the Steam and Gas Lab- 
oratory Building; the Locomotive Building; Machine Shop Building; Forge 
Shop Building; and the Foundry and Pattern Shop Building. The Steam 
and Gas Laboratory has a 150 H. P. cross compound Nordberg engine; 
a 535 cubic foot air compressor ; a Kerr Steam Turbine connected to a 
35 kilowatt, 220 volt alternating current generator ; three other steam en- 
gines of various types; condensors, various types of air brakes; several 
types of steam and power pumps; a 50 H. P. suction gas producer and en- 
gine; four gas engines; one oil engine; a 1000 lb. refrigerating machine; 
all necessary small apparatus ; a 50,000 lb. Olsen Testing machine ; a 2,500 
foot pound Olsen Torsion machine; and an American Type eight wheel 
locomotive given the College by the C. & N. W. Ry. Co. for testing pur- 
poses. The Machine Shop, Fore Shop, Foundry and Pattern Shop are each 
well equipped for scientific work. 

The following studies are open to graduates :— 

Mechanics of Engineering; Hydraulics; Heating Design; Machine Work; Sem- 
inars; Machine Design; Steam Engines and Boilers; Power Plant Engineering; Steam 
and Gas Laboratory; Crane Design; Gas Engine Construction and Operation; Gas 
Engine Design; Power Engineering; and Railway Mechanical Engineering. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Mechanical Engineer, see 
page 12. 

Mining Engineering 

Professor Beyer; Associate Professors Hodson, Gabriel 

All of the subjects offered are required of undergraduates who spe- 
cialize in Mining Engineering and Metallurgy, but may be elected for 
minor work by graduates who are majoring along other lines. The de- 
partment does not, at the present time, offer major work for an advanced 
degree. 

The department occupies six rooms in Engineering Hall and six rooms 
in the Engineering Annex and Ceramics Building. The museum for 
geology and mining engineering is well equipped for the technical work of 
mining engineers. A complete Sullivan diamond drill prospecting outfit, 
a Water Leyner air drill, a complete set of miner's drills and tools, pros- 
pector's pans, picks, anemometers, barometers and clinometers, and mine, 



GRADUATE DIVISION 



17 




Engineering Shops 



geological, and topographical maps of the most important mining districts 
add to the equipment. Wet and Dry metallurgical laboratories with the 
latest and best apparatus are maintained for all students. 
The following studies are for graduates : — 

Assaying; Mining Engineering; Metallurgy; and Seminars. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Engineer of Mines see 
page 12. 

Physics 

Professor Spinney; Assistant Professors Kunerth, Plagge, Stiles, Thomp- 
son 

Major and minor work leading to the degree of Master of Science 
is offered in heat, sound, light, illumination, electricity, magnetism, and 
radio-activity. 

Students electing major work in Physics must hold a baccalaureate de- 
gree and present undergraduate credits for at least two year's work in 
mathematics and one year's work in chemistry. 

The department occupies fifteen rooms in Engineering Hall and nine 
rooms in Engineering Annex. These rooms include nine laboratories, five 
class rooms and three apparatus rooms. 

The Engineering Assembly, which is used as a Physics lecture room, is 
fitted with two lanterns, a projectoscope and screens, gas, compressed air 
and water connections, and electric connections to storage batteries and 
direct and alternating current dynamos. 

The different laboratories are well equipped for scientific work. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Laboratory-Mechanics, Heat, and Light; Advanced Course in Heat; Advanced 
Course in Light; Illumination; Electricity and Magnetism; Electron Theory and 
Radioactivity; History of Physics; Theory of Heat; Wave Motion and Sound; Theory 
of Light; Theory of Electricity and Magnetism; and Research. 



28 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Structure Design 

Associate Professor Kimball 

The department offers major and minor work for the degree of 
Master of Science along the lines of design of industrial structures, rural 
buildings, and the design and construction of tall office buildings. 

The Department of Structure Design offers work to students who wish 
to study interesting problems in building construction. The work is so 
arranged that many different classes of buildings are studies and worked 
out in detail. With the facilities offered in the way of valuable library 
material as well as the equipment of the shops it is possible to carry out 
many problems in design both from the practical and theoretical stand- 
points. The ultimate aim of the work is to give students the opportunity 
to make specilal application of the principles learned during the under- 
graduate course. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Special Interior Design; Advanced Design; Seminars; Elements of Structural 
Design as Applied to Agricultural Structures; Advanced Freehand Drawing; History 
of Structure Design; Industrial Structures; Sanitation of Buildings; and Estimating. 



Veterinary Anatomy 

Professor Murphey 

Major and minor work for the degree of Master of Science are offered 
by the department in histology and in gross, anatomy. Minor work in 
anatomy is suggested for students majoring in animal nutritution, biological 
chemistry, pathology, physiology, and zoology. 








) 1 a », tm -ill U 1 n 



4tilipui.^B!a-iiL.»-. r uiUjt ' l,.W.iJ." 



."**-'-'" •'-< 



Veterinary Hall 



GRADUATE DIVISION 29 

The student who major in anatomy for an advanced degree is ex- 
pected to have had a Four year course in Veterinary Medicine in a stand- 
ard institution or to have had a training in anatomy and related subjects 
which will permit of advanced stud)-. 

The department is equipped to give instruction in the most scientific 
phases of anatmm to students of Veterinary Medicine or Animal Hus- 
bandry. The laboratories are all well equipped. In Histology and < >s- 
teolbg} each student is assigned an individual desk provided with a micro- 
scope, 1(H) permanent mounts of tissue, laboratory notes, and one-half 
skeleton of disarticulated hones of the horse. A large and technically pre- 
pared list oi specimens is used in the class and laboratory demonstrations. 

The following studies are open to graduates: — 

Osteology and Arthrology; Microscopy and Microscopic Anatomy; Myology and 
Splanchnology of the Horse; Microscopic Anatomy of the Organs of the Domestic 
Animals: Myology, Angiology, Neurology, Topography; Anatomy of Domestic An- 
imals; Comparative Anatomy; Research in Anatomy. 

Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology 

Professor Dimock ; Associate Professor Murray 

The department offers major and minor work leading to the Master's 
Degree along the lines of systemic pathology of specific infectious diseases, 
pathology of sporadic diseases, tumors, chemical pathology, veterinary bac- 
teriology, immunity and serum therapy. 

The student who elects pathology for his major work must take Micro- 
scopy and Microscopic Anatomy, Microscopic Anatomy of the Organs of 
the Domestic Animals, General and Pathogenic Bacteriology, and General 
Pathology, or their equivalent. When veterinary bacteriology is chosen as 
major work the student must have taken General and Pathogenic Bac- 
teriology or its equivalent. 

Students who major or minor in veterinary bacteriology including im- 
munity and serum therapy will classify with the Department of Bacteri- 
ology in the Industrial Science Division, but will do their work in the De- 
partment of Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology. 

The Department of Pathology and Bacteriology occupies the north- 
east building of the veterinary group. The building was planned and 
arrranged for the work given in this department. Two offices open direct- 
ly into a private laboratory which is used by the men in charge to investi- 
gate problems pertaining to their lines of work. A large general lab- 
oratory faces the north and has window's on the sides, supplying the 
best possible light for microscopic work. Each of the thirty individ- 
ual desks in this laboratory has a plate glass top, making possible the per- 
fect sanitary conditions necessary in handling infectious material. The 
desks are supplied with gas lamps, microscopes, and accessories necessary 
for carrying on work in both pathology and bacteriology. In connection 
with this laboratory there are two well equipped preparation rooms, one 
devoted to work in pathology and the other to work in bacteriology. The 



30 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

department also has the use of a large class room which is provided with 
lantern slide and microscopic projection equipment. 
The following studies are open to graduates : — 

General Pathology; Special Pathology; Advanced Pathology; Immunity and Serum 
Therapy; Research in Pathology; and Research in Bacteriology. 

Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology 

Professor Bergman 

The department offers major work for the Master's Degree along 
lines of investigation of physiological subjects relative to veterinary 
science ; and minor and supporting work in physiology for graduate stu- 
dents in science, dairying, and annual husbandry who are doing their ma- 
jor work along such lines as nutrition, milk or beef production, feeding 
problems, breeding, etc. 

The student who elects physiology as his major is expected to have 
taken as undergraduate work the equivalent of eight hours in Comparative 
Physiology together with such work in anatomy, histology, and chemistry as 
may be essential. 

The southeast building of the Veterinary group is devoted to the work 
in Physiology, Pharmacy and Materia Medica, and Therapeutics. The 
laboratories are equipped for research work in Physiology. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — - 

Comparative Physiology; Advanced Comparative Physiology; and Research in 
Physiology. 

Zoology 

Professor Summers; Associate Professors Guthrie, Bartholomew 
The department offers major and minor work for the Master's Degree 
along the lines of entomology, comparative physiology, invertebrate and 
vertebrate comparative anatomy; and major work for the Doctor's Degree 
along the lines of entomology and comparative physiology. Majors in any 
of these lines are research work. 

If the student elects entomology as his major he is expected to have taken the 
equivalent of Advanced Entomology and Economic Entomology; if general zoology, the 
equivalent of General Zoology and Embryology; and if physiology, the equivalent of 
Embryology and Human Physiology. 

The following studies are open to graduates : — 

Evolution of Animals; Vertebrate Comparative Anatomy; Morphology; Advanced 
Invertebrate Comparative Anatomy; Advanced Entomology; Neurology; Economic 
Entomology; Orchard and Nursery Inspection; Literature of Entomology; and Re- 
search in Entomology. 

DEPARTMENTS OFFERING MINOR WORK ONLY 

The work in the following departments is undergraduate in character 
and is subordinate and auxiliary to the work of the departments which 
offer major lines. 

Agricultural Education 

Professor Wilson; Assistant Professors Schermerhorn, Dadisman 
The department offers minor work in certain fundamental courses 
which should be taken by one who expects to teach technical subjects. 

The demand for the professional training of teachers has gradually 



LltirfAHT I'* IHt 

JAN 8 1931 

GRADUATE DIVISION (<• > 3t ., , , 

extended upward through the grades and high school, until now many col- 
leges give it consideration in the selection of members of the instructional 
staff. Because of the evident tendency to require professional training, 
any graduate student who expects to teach is urged to elect work in this 
department as a minor if he has not already completed at least fifteen 
hours of such work. Students in this college who remain for a fifth year 
may well consider making this work one of the lines to be followed. 
The studies open, as minors only, to graduates are : — 
Educational History: Vocational Education; School Administration; Methods and 
Practice "Teaching; and Research in Education, 

Agricultural Journalism 
Professor Beckman ; Assistant Professor Conybeare 

Graduate students may minor in this department, taking work in any 
of the subjects offered to undergraduates. The instruction is designed to 
give students facility in contributing to agricultural and other technical 
journals. 

The studies open, as minors only, to graduates are : — 

Agricultural, Home Economics, and Engineering Journalism; and Agricultural 
Publicity. 

History 

Professor Cessna; Associate Professor Schmidt 

Students majoring for advanced degrees in agriculture or industrial 
science or applied economics and social science may minor in history by 
taking certain studies open to undergraduates. The chief purpose of this 
work is to furnish an historical foundation for the study of the present 
day economic and social problems in technical fields. The new trend in 
historical science has brought the study of history into a very fundamental 
relation to the industrial sciences. 

The following studies, as minors only, are open to graduates : — 

Economic History of American Agriculture; Industrial History of England; His- 
tory of Immigration to the United States; Iowa History; History of Transportation 
in the United States; History of the United States as a World Power; and Industrial 
History of the United States, 1860-1880. 

Psychology 

Professor Cessna; Assistant Professor Vance 

Students majoring for advanced degrees in agriculture or industrial 
science or applied economics and social science may minor in psychology. 
It is evident that all subjects involving the human element must be based 
on the knowledge of the laws of mental action. The study of psychology 
is regarded as necessary to the proper understanding of industrial develop- 
ment and efficiency. 

The following studies, as minors only, are open to graduates : — 

Ethics; Social Psychology; Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence; Educa- 
tional Psychology; Psychology of Business; The Animal Mind; and Physical and 
Mental Tests. 




Campus Scene; 



^'ToWA STATE COLLEGE 



OF 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS 

AMES. IOWA 



THE GRADUATE DIVISION 
1916-1917 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 



Vol. 15 JULY I, 1916 No. 5 



"" LFBWmr OF THE 
JAN« 1931 

ANNOUNCEMENT" ■$. 



OF THE 



GRADUATE DIVISION 



AMES, IOWA 



Published Tri- Monthly by the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Aits. 
Entered as Second-class Matter, October 26, 1915, at the Post Office at Ames, Iowa, 
under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904 



The College 

The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts conducts 
work along five major lines : 

Agriculture 
Engineering 
Home Economics 
Industrial Science 
Veterinary Medicine 

The Graduate Division conducts advanced research and instruction in 
all these five lines. 

Four, five, and six year collegiate courses are offered in different divi- 
sions of the College. Non-collegiate courses are offered in agriculture, 
engineering, and home economics. Summer Sessions include graduate, 
collegiate, and non-collegiate work. Short courses are offered in the 
winter. 

Extension courses are conducted at various points throughout the state. 

Research work is conducted in the Agricultural and Engineering Ex- 
periment Stations and in the Veterinary Research Laboratory. 

Special announcements of the different branches of the work are sup- 
plied, free of charge, on application. The general college catalogue will 
be sent on request. 

Address Herman Knapp, Registrar, 

Ames, Iowa. 



Table of Contents 



PAGE 

The College ( 1 Hvisions and Activities) 2 

Administration 4 

Iowa State Board o\ Education 4 

Officers of Administration of the College 4 

College Calendar 5 

Officers oi Administration and Instruction 6 

General Information 10 

General Statement 10 

Graduate Faculty 10 

( )rganization 10 

Aims and Methods 11 

Fees and Expenses 11 

Clubs and Societies 12 

Honorary Fraternities 12 

Admission 12 

Classification .- 13 

Degrees 13 

Requirements for the Master's Degree 14 

Requirements for the Master's Degree partly in absentia 14 

Advanced Standing 15 

Requirements for the Doctor's Degree 15 

Requirements for the Professional Degrees 16 

Fellowships and Scholarships 16 

Instructors and Assistants > 17 

Departments Offering Graduate Instruction 17 

PAGE PAGE 

Agricultural Engineering 17 Forestry 24 

Agronomy 18 Geology 25 

Animal Husbandry 18 Home Economics 25 

Bacteriology and Hygiene 19 Horticulture 26 

Botany 20 Mathematics 26 

Ceramics 20 Mechanical Engineering 27 

Chemical Engineering 21 Mining Engineering 27 

Chemistry 21 Physics 28 

Civil Engineering 22 Structural Design 28 

Dairying 22 Veterinary Anatomy 28 

Economic Science 22 Veterinary Pathology 29 

Electrical Engineering 23 Veterinary Physiology 29 

Farm Management 24 Zoology 30 

Departments Offering Minor Work Only 30 

Agricultural Education 30 

History 31 

Psychology 31 



ADMINISTRATION 

The laws of the State of Iowa provide for the management and con- 
trol of the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts by the State 
Board of Education. This board consists of nine men nominated by 
the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. This board appoints a finance 
committee consisting of three men who give their entire time to the man- 
agement of the four state educational institutions of Iowa, under such 
rules and regulations as the State Board of Education may prescribe. 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



Hon. D. D. Murphy, President Elkader 

Hon. Frank F. Jones Villisca 

Hon. Willard C. Stuckslager Lisbon 

Hon. Geo. T. Baker Davenport 

Hon. Paul Stillman Jefferson 

Hon. Chas. R. Brenton Dallas Center 

Hon. P. K. Holbrook Onawa 

Hon. Edw. P. Schoentgen Council Bluffs 

Hon. H. M. Eicher Washington 

I> I NANCE COMMITTEE 

Hon. W. R. Boyd, President Cedar Rapids 

Hon. Thomas Lambert Sabula 

Hon. W. H. Gemmill, Secretary Des Moines 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Jackson W. Bowdish, Auditor and Accountant Des Moines 

P. E. McClenahan, Inspector of Secondary Schools Des Moines 

John E. Foster, Assistant Inspector Des Moines 

Leslie I. Reed, Assistant Inspector Des Moines 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE COLLEGE 

Raymond Allen Pearson, M. S. in Agr., LL. D President 

Edgar Williams Stanton, M. S., LL. D. 

Vice-President, Secretary, and Dean of the Junior College 
Charles Franklin Curtiss, M. S. A., D. S. 

Dean of the Division of Agriculture 

Anson Marston, C. E Dean of the Division of Engineering 

Charles Henry Stange, D. V. M. 

Dean of the Division of Veterinary Medicine 

Catharine J. MacKay Dean of the Division of Home Economics 

R. E. Buchanan, M. S., Ph. D...Dean of the Division of Industrial Science 

Herman Knapp, B. S. A Treasurer and Registrar 

Thomas Sloss Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Mrs. Emily Cunningham Advisor for Women 



College Calendar 

1916-1917 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 7-8— Entrance examinations. 
September 11-12 — Registration of graduate students. 
September 13— Lectures begin. 

September 16 — Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. reception. 
November S9 t z-'- 1111 -^ — Thanksgiving vacation Jitiiiii'iT. 
- Prrrmlur 1 7 ; 10 , v *i V-g 'ntinn nlmri. 
December 20 12:00 m. — Christmas vacation begins. 
January 2. 12:00 M. — Vacation closes. 
January 26, 12:00 m. — First semester closes. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 1-2 — Entrance examinations. 

February 5-6— Registration of graduate students. 

February 7 — Lectures begin. 

February 10 — Y. \V. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. reception. 

April 5, 12:00 m. — Easter vacation begins. 

April 9, 5 :00 p. m. — Easter vacation closes. 

June 3, 10:30 a.m. — Baccalaureate sermon. 

June 5. 9:30 a.m. — Alumni business meeting. 

June 6. 1 :00 p. m. — Alumni, faculty, senior, banquet. 

June 7, 10:30 a.m. — Commencement. 

summer session 

June 11 — Summer session begins. 
August 30 — Summer session closes. 

1917-1918 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 6-7 — Entrance examinations. 

September 10-11 — Registration of graduate students. 



"Officers of Administration and Instruction 

of 
The Graduate Division 

President and Deans 

Raymond Allen Pearson. 1912 President 

B. S. in Agr., Cornell University, 1894; M. S. in Agr., 1899; LL. D., 
Alfred University, 1909. 

Edgar Williams Stanton. **1877, 1873 Vice-President, Dean of the 

Junior College, Professor of Mathematics 
B. Sc, Iowa State College, 1872; M. Sc, 1887; LL. D., Coe College, 
1904. 

Charles Franklin Curtiss. 1897, 1891 Dean of the Division of 

Agriculture, Director of Experiment Station 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1887; M. S. A., 1892; D. S. in Agri- 
culture, Michigan Agricultural College, 1907. 

Anson Marston. 1892.... Dean of the Division of Engineering, Professor 

C. E., Cornell University, 1899. of Civil Engineering 
Charles Henry Stange. 1909, 1907.... Dean of the Division of Veterinary 

Medicine, Professor of Veterinary Theory and Practice 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1907. 

Robert Earle Buchanan. 1909-1904 Dean of the Division of Industrial 

Science, Professor of Bacteriology 
B. S., Iowa State College, 1904; M. S., 1906; Ph. D., Chicago Uni- 
versity, 1908. 

Catharine J. MacKay. 1911, 1910 Dean of the Division of Home 

Economics, Professor of Home Economics 
Diploma, Drexel Institute, 1907; Boston Cooking School, 1907; Teach- 
ers' College, Columbia University, 1910, 1914. 

Professors 

Spencer Ambrose Beach. 1905 Vice-Dean of the Division of 

Agriculture, Professor of Horticulture 
B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1887; M. S., 1892. 

Harold Edward Bemis. 1913, 1908 Vice-Dean of the Division of 

Veterinary Medicine, Professor of Veterinary Surgery 
I). V. M., Iowa State College, 1908. 

* The Graduate Faculty is composed of the president, deans, heads of departments 
in which graduate instruction is authorized, and other members of the faculties who 
are in charge of graduate instruction. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 7 

Samuel Walker Beyer. 1898, 1891.. ..Vice-Dean of the Division of Engi- 
neering, Professor of Geology and Mining Engineering 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1889; Ph. D.. Johns Hopkins Univ., 1895. 
John Edwin Brindley. 1913, 1 () ()7 Professor of Economics 

B. L,., University pf Wisconsin, 1902; A. M.. 1906; Ph. D.. University 

Of Iowa, 1911. 
Percj Edgar Brown. 1 ( >14. 1910 Professor of Soil Bacteriology 

B. Sc, Rutgers College, 1906; A. ML, 1909; Ph. 1)., 1912. 
Orange Howard Cessna. 1900 Professor of History and Psychology 

B. S.. Iowa State College. 1872; B. D., Garrett Biblical Institute, 1885; 

1). 1).. 1900; A. M., Cornell College, 1901. 
Winfred Forest Coover. 1^13, 1914 Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., Otterbein University, 1900; A. M., Ohio State University, 1903. 
William Wallace Dimock. 1911, 1909 Professor of Veterinary 

Pathology and Bacteriology 

B. Agr.. Connecticut Agricultural College, 1901 ; D. V. M., Cornell 
University, 1905; D. V. M., University of Habana, 1907. 

Fred Alan Fish. 1907, 1905 Professor of Electrical Engineering 

M. E. in E. E., Ohio State University, 1898. 
Harald De Mott Hughes. 1910 Professor of Farm Crops 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1907; M. S. A., Univ. of Missouri, 1908, 
Henry Herbert Kildee. 1914, 1910 Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1908. 
Gilmour Beyers MacDonald. 1913, 1910 Professor of Forestry 

B. S. F.. University of Nebraska, 1907; M. F., 1914. 
Warren H. Meeker. 1907, 1891 Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

M. E., Cornell University, 1891. 
Martin Mortensen. 1909 Professor of Dairying 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1909. 
Harlan Bruce Munger. 1914 Professor of Farm Management 

B. S., Cornell University, 1912. 
Howard Sylvester Murphey. 1913, 1909 Professor of Veterinary 

D. V. M.. Ohio State University, 1908. Anatomy and Histology 
Louis Hermann Pammel. 1889 Professor of Botany 

B. Agr., University of Wisconsin, 1885; M. S., 1889; Ph. D., Wash- 
ington University, St. Louis, 1898. 
AVilliam Harper Pew. 1912, 1909 Professor of Animal Husbandry 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1907. 
Maria M. Roberts. 1913, 1891 . .Vice-Dean of the Junior College, Professor 

B. L., Iowa State College, 1890. of Mathematics 

Louis Bevier Spinney. 1897, 1891 Professor of Physics 

B. M. E., Iowa State College, 1892; B. S. (E. E.), 1893. 
William Henry Stevenson. 1903, 1902 Professor of Agronomy, Vice- 
Director of Experiment Station 

A. B.. Illinois College, 1893; B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1905. 
Guy Mitchell Wilson. 1913 Professor of Agricultural Education 

A. B., Indiana University, 1900; M. A., 1908. 



8 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Associate Professors 

Henry Dale Bergman. 1913, 1910 Associate Professor of Veterinary 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1910. Physiology and Pharmacology 

George Arthur Chaney. 1914, 1913. . .Associate Professor of Mathematics 
M. S., Highland Park College, 1906; M. A., Univ. of Wisconsin, 1910. 

Julia True-man Colpitts. 1913, 1900. .Associate Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., Mount Allison University, Canada, 1899; A. M., Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1900. 

Martin Francis Paul Costelloe. 1912, 1911. . .Associate Professor of Agri- 

B. S. in C. E., University of Nebraska, 1906. cultural Engineering 
Chester Charles Fowler. 1913, 1909. .. .Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B. S. in Chem. Eng., University of Illinois, 1909; M. S., 1913; Ph. D., 

Jefferson Medical College, 1915. 
Joseph Edward Guthrie. 1913, 1902 Associate Professor of Zoology 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1900; M. S., 1901. 
Bernard Wernick Hammer. 1913, 1911 Associate Professor of Dairy 

B. S. A., University of Wisconsin. 1908. Bacteriology 

John Owen Rankin. 1916 Associate Professor of Economic Science 

A. B., Tarkio College. 1904; B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1908; A. M., 
George Washington University, 1912. 

Orren Lloyd-Jones. 1914, 1913. .Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1908; M. S., 1911 ; Ph. D., 1913. 

John Nathan Martin 1912, 1911 Associate Professor of Botany 

A. B., Indiana University, 1907; Ph. D., University of Chicago, 1913. 
Charles Murray. 1913, 1908. .. .Associate Professor of Veterinary Path- 
ology and Bacteriology 

Pe. B., Drake University, 1906; B. S., Iowa State College, 1910; 
D. V. M., 1912. 
Raemer R. Renshaw. 1914, 1913. . .Assoc. Professor of Organic Chemistry 

B. S., University of Oregon, 1902; M. S., 1903; Ph. D., Columbia 
University, 1907. 

Louis Bernard Schmidt. 1911, 1906 Associate Professor of History 

Ph. B., Cornell College, 1901 ; A. M., 1906. 
Roy Eugene Smith. 1914, 1909 Associate Professor of Soils 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1909; M. S., 1911. 
Homer Francis Staley. 1914. .Associate Professor of Mining Engineering 

B. A., Ohio State University, 1904. 
Louis Agassiz Test. 1914, 1913 Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B. M. E., Purdue University, 1894; A. C, 1896; Ph. D., University of 

Chicago, 1907. 
George Henry Von Tungeln. 1914, 1913.. Assoc. Prof, of Rural Sociology 

Ph. B., Central Westleyan College, 1909; M. A., Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1910. 
John Anderson Wilkinson. 1914, 1913. .. .Associate Professor of Physical 

Chemistry and Inorganic Analysis 

B. Sc, Ohio State University, 1903; Ph. D., Cornell University, 1909. 



GRADUATE DIVISK >N 9 

Assistant Professors 

Henry Ellsworth Ewing. 1914 Entomology 

B. A.. Universitj of Illinois. L906; M. A., Universitj of Illinois, 1908; 
Ph. D., Cornell University, 1911. 

Wi\ Levine. 1914, 1913 Bacteriology and Hygiene 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1^12. 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

Arthur Wayland Dox, B. S., A. M., Ph. D Chief in Chemistry 

A. T. Erwin, M. S Chief in Truck Crops 

John Marcus Evvard, M. S Assistant Chief in Animal Husbandry 

Orson Gunnel! Lloyd. B. S., M. S. . .Assistant Chief in Farm Management 



Graduate Division 

President Raymond A. Pearson, Acting Dean 
GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts offers major 
and minor work for the degree of Master of Science in the following sub- 
jects with special application to the industries: agronomy, animal hus- 
bandry, bacteriology, botany, chemistry, dairying, economics, engineering, 
farm management, forestry, geology, horticulture, mathematics, physics, 
veterinary anatomy, veterinary pathology, veterinary physiology, and zool- 
ogy. Graduate instruction leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
is also offered in agronomy, animal husbandry, bacteriology, botany, chem- 
istry, dairying, geology, horticulture, and zoology. Additional minor sup- 
porting work is offered in other departments to supplement graduate study 
along technical lines. 

FACULTY 

The president, the deans, the heads of the departments in which grad- 
uate instruction is authorized, and other members of the faculties who are 
in immediate charge of graduate instruction are members of the Graduate 
Faculty. 

ORGANIZATION 

The instruction and training of graduate students has been one of the 
functions of the Iowa State College since its early history. The first de- 
gree of Master of Science was conferred in 1877. In 1879 the first degree 
of Civil Engineer and the first degree of Master of Philosophy were con- 
ferred. In early years, the department or departments in which the stu- 
dent was registered mapped out the applicant's course and supervised his 
work. Later, when the divisions of the College had been created, each 
division controlled its own graduate work. It was not long, however, 
until the number of graduate students and the diversified character of 
their work demanded further organization, and a Graduate Committee was 
appointed to supervise the work of all graduate students. This Committee 
was in charge until 1913 when the increase in the graduate work made it 
necessary to still further perfect the organization and the Graduate Di- 
vision was established. The Graduate Division is administered by the 
President of the College as Acting Dean and the Graduate Faculty. Under 
this organization the graduate work to be pursued in any case is under the 
Acting Dean, the head of the department, and the professor in charge of 
the work. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 11 

AIMS AND METHODS 

This is ail age of .meat commercial, scientific, and social interests, and 
these interests are demanding greater economy, specialization in science, 
and more hunianitarianisni. To meet these demands the leaders in the 
different lines <>i industry, science, and social affairs must have access to 
more specialized training than can he secured in four years of study. The 
man who would he a successful competitor as an expert in any of the dif- 
ferent lines o\ agriculture, or as a skilled chemist, engineer, botanist, bac- 
teriologist, applied economic science expert, or as a teacher or investigator 
in any of these subjects can by graduate training so increase his efficiency 
a- t" open up opportunities otherwise denied him. The development of 
scientific agriculture, engineering, manufacturing, and all the supporting 
sciences is dependent upon this training. A greater Iowa, economically 
and socially, is impossible without it. The Iowa State College has long 
since realized its responsihility in the further development of the many 
lines of research work in harmony with the industrial needs of the com- 
monwealth. 

Lectures, laboratory work, and seminar methods in which the student is 
in contact with his research problems are used in the development of the 
graduate work. The investigative work is shared by instructor and stu- 
dent, and the student acquires the spirit as well as the methods of pro- 
ductive work. To further encourage this spirit of research, provision has 
been made for the publication of specially meritorious work along some 
of the lines of investigation of which the institution has charge. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Incidental and Janitor Fee: The regular incidental and janitor fee 
for the semester is $12.00, but all students who classify during the classi- 
fication period, Friday and Saturday before College work begins, will be 
charged only $9 00 a semester. Graduate scholars and fellows are re- 
quired to pay a two dollar hospital fee, a fee of one dollar for each hour's 
work up to seven hours, and laboratory fees in their minor only. 

Laboratory Fees: Laboratory fees at the actual cost of breakage and 
usage are charged to students, the Treasurer's receipt for the fee being 
required before the students are admitted to laboratories. Some fees rep- 
resent charges for mimeograph notes which are furnished at cost ; usually 
when these notes are supplied no text book is required and the fee is in 
lieu of text book purchase. Deposits are required in some departments to 
cover the value of equipment loaned to students, and at the end of the 
term the amount is returned less deduction for loss and breakage. For 
the amount of the fee in any study the student should refer to the descrip- 
tion of studies under the department in which the study is taught. Schol- 
ars and fellows are exempt from laboratory fees in their major work. 

Diploma Fee: For the Master's, Doctor's, or Professional Degrees, 
$5.00. This does not include the cost of the Master's or Doctor's hood. 



12 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 

In the interest of research and investigation along the lines of applied 
science and for training in the presentation of results, several clubs and 
societies have been organized by the instructors and students in the differ- 
ent departments. Among these are the following : 

Graduate Club. I. S. C. Branch of the American So- 

Iowa Section of American Society ciety of Agricultural Engineers. 

of Agronomy. I. S. C. Branch of the American In- 

Botany Seminar. stitute of Electrical Engineers. 

Physics Seminar. Chemistry Seminar. 

Applied Social Science Club. I. S. C. Branch of the American In- 

Mathematics Colloquium. stitute of Mining Engineers. 

Bacteriology Seminar. Civil Engineering Society. 



HONORARY FRATERNITIES 

The following is a list of the Honorary Fraternities of Iowa State 
College, some of which are maintaining regular programs along lines of 
research work : 

Phi Lambda Upsilon. Gamma Sigma Delta. 

Phi Kappa Phi. Omicron Nu. 

Alpha Zeta. Delta Sigma Rho. 

Tau Beta Pi. 

ADMISSION 

Graduates of Iowa State College, as well as graduates of other colleges 
and universities of approved standing, are admitted to the Graduate Di- 
vision. Before entering upon graduate work in any department, however, 
the applicant must present evidence that he has had the necessary pre- 
requisite training that will enable him to pursue with profit the courses 
desired. It should be remembered, also, that admission to graduate work 
does not necessarily imply admission to candidacy for a degree. 

Graduate students wishing to become candidates for the Master's or 
Doctor's degree will make application in writing to the Dean of the Grad- 
uate Division not later than February 1 of the year in which the degree is 
sought. This application should be approved and signed by the head of the 
department in which the major subject is offered and by all other members 
of the faculty under whom the student has done work in support of his 
candidacy. If the applicant has completed any graduate work in another 
institution, an authorized statement of the same should be filed with the 
application for candidacy for degree. 

For purposes of admission to the Graduate Division an approved college 
or university is one which requires four years' work of collegiate grade 
for graduation, based upon an entrance requirement of at least fourteen 
standard high school units. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 13 

A candidate for admission should secure an application blank from the 
Registrar or I Kan (preferably in advance). Tins blank should be properly 
Idled out and returned. When the application is approved the Registrar 
will issue a permit to enroll. Upon the payment of fees the candidate is 
given a receipt winch he presents to the Dean, who is the classifying 
officer. 

Registration should be on regular classifications days to avoid paymenl 
oi extra fee and it should he completed within two weeks after the open- 
ing of a semester to receive full credit for the semester's work. 

CLASSIFICATION 

The classification of all regular graduate students must he completed in 
conformity with the following rules: 

1. From a minimum of 15 to a maximum of 20 credit hours may be 
taken each semester. 

2. A major subject allowed by the rules of candidacy for a degree 
shall be chosen; all major, minor and supporting work shall be outlined in 
consultation with the head of the department in which the major is taken. 

3. Unless otherwise specially permitted a graduate student shall carry 
at least one study of strictly graduate grade each semester. In any case at 
least four hours of strictly graduate work must be completed each year. 

4. The course of study as outlined shall not be amended or changed 
except by the approval of the Dean of the Graduate Division, and any 
such change shall be in writing and shall be filed with the original course 
of study. 

5. In special cases a limited amount of credit may be given in subjects 
not catalogued as graduate studies where these are taken as a minor and 
bear directly upon the major subject and are recommended by the pro- 
fessor in charge of the major work and approved by the Dean. 

6. Graduate students who are not candidates for an advanced degree 
are not required to designate a major or a minor subject but may elect 
their work with a view to their special purpose. Any course of study in 
the Graduate Division is open for election by such students upon the same 
conditions that are imposed upon those who are candidates for a degree. 
If at any time such special students desire to become candidates for an ad- 
vanced degree, due consideration and credit will be given for work already 

done. 

NOTE: Any deficiency in Modern Lanffuape should be made up immediately. See 
requirements in Modern Language for advanced decrees. 

DEGREES 

The higher degrees conferred by the Iowa State College are the Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy for advanced work in the technical 
fields especially developed at this college; and the Professional Degrees of 
Civil Engineer (C. E.), Electrical Engineer (E. E), Mechanical Engineer 
CM. 1-;.), Engineer of Mines (E. M.), Ceramic Engineer (Cer. E.), Chem- 



14 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ical Engineer (Ch. E.), Agricultural Engineer (A. E.), ami Master of 
Agriculture (M. Agr.). 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREE 

The degree of Master of Science may be conferred upon students who 
have completed work in compliance with the following provisions and re- 
quirements : 

1. At least one year must be spent in resident work. 

2. At least thirty credit hours or the equivalent must be completed, at 
least half of which should be from this institution. 

3. A minimum of twenty credit hours shall be completed in the major 
work, and a maximum of ten credit hours in the minor work. The minor 
work may be taken in the same department in which the major is taken, 
but both major and minor may not be taken under the same instructor. 

4. A satisfactory reading knowledge of French or German must be 
certified to by the Head of the Department of Modern Languages prior 
to admission to examination. Upon the recommendation of the head of 
the department some other modern language may be substituted for French 
or German. 

5. Such subjects as are designated as "undergraduate and graduate" 
or "graduate" will be credited toward the advanced degree. Major work 
will ordinarily be restricted to graduate subjects. See 5 under Classifica- 
tion. 

6. Thesis is optional with the department in which the major work is 
taken. 

7. Examination shall be taken on all graduate work including thesis 
when this is required. This shall be oral or written as determined by the 
instructors concerned. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREE PARTLY 
IN ABSENTIA 

Any graduate of Iowa State College or other institution of high stand- 
ing may be permitted to do one-half the required work for the Master's 
Degree in absentia as follows : 1. The applicant must be in residence at 
this institution during at least three six-weeks summer sessions. 2. Dur- 
ing the period of two consecutive years while not in residence at the Col- 
lege the candidate must pursue a course of advanced study previously ar- 
ranged by the head of the department in which the work is done and 
which has been approved by the Dean of the Graduate Division. This 
absentia work is expected to equal in amount that normally accomplished 
in three six-weeks summer sessions and is to lie along the line of his 
major work. Such special students are required to pass examinations on 
all work done at the College and in absentia. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 15 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Graduate students of approved colleges and universities who have com- 
pleted a portion <>i the requirements for the Master's or Doctor's degree in 

the technical lines developed at this institution, may be permitted to enroll 
as graduate students and finish their work for the desired degree. For the 
Master's degree at least one year of residence will be required, in which 
not less than fifteen credit hours of graduate work must he completed. 
For the Doctor's degree at least one year of residence will he required, in 
which not less than thirty hours of graduate work, inclusive of dissertation, 
must he completed. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCTOR'S DEGREE 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy may be conferred upon students 
who complete work in compliance with the following provisions and re- 
quirements : 

1. Three years of graduate work are required, one of which must be 
spent at this institution. 

_ > . The degree will be conferred not solely as a result of a faithful 
study over any period, but for ability to do research work of a scholarly 
character and the successful passing of all examinations. 

3. Major work shall be taken in one subject, or, in exceptional cases, 
in two closely related subjects. Two minors shall be taken when only one 
major is chosen, and one minor shall be taken when two majors are 
chosen. 

4. Minor work shall represent from one-fourth to one-third of the 
work for the degree. 

5. One minor must be taken outside the department in which the major 
is taken. 

6. A reading knowledge of French and German must be certified to 
by the Head of the Department of Modern Languages at least one year 
prior to final examination. 

7. During the last two years of graduate work only such courses as 
are designated as "graduate" shall be credited on major work. 

8. A thesis which is a real contribution to knowledge along some line 
in which the major is taken must be completed. The student should con- 
sult the Dean of the Graduate Division for information regarding the 
form in which the thesis must be presented. 

9. Xot later than April 1st of the academic year in which the degree 
is sought, the candidate shall have his thesis approved by the head of the 
department in which the major work has been taken and submitted in type- 
written form to the Dean of the Graduate Division, who shall refer it to a 
committee for the purpose of final approval. 

10. Publication of the thesis by the candidate or by a scientific journal 
is required. In either case the degree will not be conferred until two type- 



16 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

written copies of the thesis have been deposited in the library and a finan- 
cial guarantee that fifty printed copies in approved form will also be de- 
posited in the library. 

11. The Dean of the Graduate Division shall appoint for each candi- 
date an examining committee composed of five members, including the pro- 
fessors in charge of the major and minor work, the chairman of which 
shall be the professor in charge of the student's major work. The Dean 
shall also designate the time and place for the examination, which may be 
either oral or written or both, over the fields of the major and first minor. 
In case a second minor is chosen, the examination over it may be waived 
if the candidate's standing in it is satisfactory. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

In Engineering the requirements may be met in any one of the three 
following ways : 

1. Graduation from a regular four-year course in engineering, one 
year of resident study approved by the engineering faculty, at least one 
year of experience in a responsible professional position, and the prepara- 
tion of a satisfactory thesis. 

2. Graduation from a regular four-year course in engineering, at least 
five years of experience in a responsible professional position, and the 
preparation of a satisfactory thesis. 

3. Graduation from a regular five-year course in engineering, at least 
one year of successful professional experience, and the preparation of a 
satisfactory thesis. 

The professional degree of Master of Agriculture may be granted by 
this institution upon the completion of a standard collegiate course in 
agriculture followed by not less than five years of eminently successful 
experience in some phase of practical or professional agriculture and the 
presentation of an acceptable thesis. 

In Agriculture and Engineering the requirements for the degree of 
Agricultural Engineer are the same as those for the Professional Engineer- 
ing degrees, except that the candidate must be recommended by the fac- 
ulties of both the Agricultural and Engineering Divisions. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

For the promotion of graduate and research work the Board of Educa- 
tion has established at Iowa State College a system of fellowships and 
scholarships. 

Scholarships are given to holders of a baccalaureate degree and carry 
with them a stipend of two hundred dollars payable in ten equal payments 
with the remission of tuition. All scholars pay a two dollar hospital fee, a 
fee of one dollar for each hour's work up to seven hours, and laboratory 
fees in their minor subjects only. Scholars are required to do three hours 
teaching a week or the equivalent. 



GR M'l' ATI- DIVISIOM 17 

Teaching Fellowships are open to graduates of reputable institutions 
ami carry with them a stipend of four hundred dollars with the remission 
of tuition. Teaching Fellows are required to do five hours of teaching a 
week or its equivalent. The Eees for Fellows are the same as those for 
Scholars. 

Junior ami Senior Research Fellowships are open to graduates of rep- 
utable institutions and have for their object the encouragement of research 
work. Junior Research Fellowships may be held during the first year of 
graduate study and carry with them a stipend of three hundred dollars 
with the remission of tuition. Senior Research Fellowships carry with 
them a stipend of five hundred dollars and are ordinarily not awarded ex- 
cept to those who have had at least one year of graduate study or research 
experience. Research Fellows in the experiment stations shall observe 
experiment station hours throughout the college year, except for the time 
given to minor work. The fees for all Fellows are the same as those for 
Scholars. 

Full resident credit may be given for graduate work to holders of 
scholarships, and of teaching and research fellowships. 

NOTE: The members of the instructional and investigational force of rank of in- 
structor or assistant are permitted to do graduate work. Those on half time em- 
ployment may receive not to exceed two-thirds time credit, and those on full time 
may receive not to exceed one-fourth time credit. All adjustments as to the amount 
of credit to be allowed shall be made between the Head of the Department in which 
the work is taken and the Dean of the Graduate Division. 

DEPARTMENTS OFFERING GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 
Agricultural Engineering 

Associate Professor Costelloe ; Associate Professor Mervine; Assistant 

Professor Lehman 

The department offers major work for the degree of Master of Science 
in Agricultural Engineering along the lines of farm machinery, farm 
power, drainage, irrigation, rural sanitation, and farm structures ; and 
minor work for students selecting major work in other departments. 

The equipment of the Department of Agricultural Engineering is very 
complete. The department occupies the greater part of Agricultural En- 
gineering Hall and the Agricultural Engineering Annex and has a large 
garage, shops, and well equipped lahoratories with the best modern farm 
machinery. 

The farm machinery equipment includes samples of steam, gasoline, 
and oil tractors, one I H C auto-wagon, one Avery three-ton truck, one or 
more samples of most every kind of the important field and power ma- 
chines. The department has several special dynamometers, the use of 
eighteen modern engines of different types with indicators and testing ap- 
paratus, a 750 watt gasoline-electric plant and two complete acetylene light- 
ing plants to add to the usefulness of the laboratory. 

The Agricultural Engineering Society, composed of teachers and ad- 



18 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

vanced students, meets once each week for the discussion of special prob- 
lems and recent developments in Agricultural Engineering. 
The following studies are open to graduates : 

Farm Machinery; Farm Motors; Rural Sanitation; Farm Structures; Drainage 
Engineering; and Irrigation. See page 92 General Catalog. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Agricultural Engineering see 
page 16. 

Agronomy 

Professors Stevenson, Hughes, Brown; Associate Professor Smith; Chief 
Burnett; Assistant Chief Potter 

Graduate work in agronomy comprises investigations in the two gen- 
eral fields of soils and of farm crops. Major and minor work for the 
Master's degree is offered along the lines of crop production, plant breed- 
ing, soil physics, soil fertility, soil bacteriology, soil humus, and soil man- 
agement. For the Doctor's degree, major and minor work is offered in 
soil fertility, soil bacteriology, and soil humus. 

In order to register for graduate work in agronomy, a student must 
have obtained his baccalaureate degree from an institution of recognized 
standing. 

The Department of Agronomy has eight commodious and well equipped 
soil laboratories for scientific work; suitable greenhouses and field plots 
for study and experimentation in soils and crops ; valuable data secured 
from extensive soil and crop experiments ; photographs, charts, and maps 
which serve the needs of advanced students. 

The Iowa Section of the American Society of Agronomy, composed 
of the graduate students in Agronomy and the department faculty, meets 
once a month during the college year for the discussion of reports and the 
encouragement of research work. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Special Problems in Production and Breeding of Farm Crops ; Methods of Crop 
Investigation; Experimentation Methods and Work; Judging; Small Grain and Forage 
Crops; Research in Plant Breeding; Research in Crop Production; Research in Soil 
Physics; Research in Soil Management; Soil Bacteriology; Research in Soil Bacteri- 
ology; Research in Soil Humus. See page 106, General Catalog. 

Animal Husbandry- 
Professors Pew, Kildee, Turpin ; Associate Professors Vaughn, Lloyd- 
Jones, Shearer, Ikeler, Ferrin ; Assistant Chief Evvard ; 
Assistant Professor Gillette 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's degree 
along the lines of animal nutrition and feeding, animal breeding, live stock 
management, dairy husbandry, and poultry husbandry, and major and 
minor work for the Doctor's degree along the lines of nutrition, genetics, 
and dairy husbandry. 

The student who enters upon graduate work in animal husbandry must 
have, in addition to a Bachelor's degree, a general knowledge of zoology, 
inorganic and organic chemistry, and he must be qualified by training to 



GRADUATE DIVISION 19 

undertake the special line of work which he elects. The major work must 

be selected from one o\ the above lines and a suitable thesis written. 
Minor subjects may he elected in this or another department. 

The equipment oi the Animal Husbandry Department consists of an 
excellent collection oi horses representative <>i the market classes and 
breeds, among which are the Shires, Percherons, Clydesdales, Belgians, 
Standardbreds, and American Saddle horses; one hundred seventy-live 
head of cattle, representing all of the leading beef and dairy hreeds, 
among which are ninety representatives of the llolsteins, Jerseys, Guern- 
seys, Ayrshires, with good sires of the different hreeds; two hundred head 
of seven different hreeds of sheep; six hreeds of the hest American and 
British varieties of swine; herd hooks, photographs, charts, and lantern 
slides : a well equipped twenty-acre poultry farm ; and a two-hundred-acre 
dairy farm. In addition there are maintained for purpose of research in 
nutrition and breeding a herd of some 300 swine, a hundred sheep and 
cattle, stocks of small laboratory animals, as well as appropriately plotted 
fields, and lahoratory and barn equipment, for their best use. 

The Graduate Club in Animal Husbandry holds monthly meetings for 
the discussion of current literature and the encouragement of research 
work. 

The following lines of study are open to graduates : 

Live Stock Production, Feeding, Management, and Judging; Milk and Wool Pro- 
duction; Herd Book Study; Animal Nutrition; Market and Breeding Types of Poul- 
try: Genetics; Seminars; Research. See page 115 of General Catalog. 

Bacteriology and Hygiene 

Professors Buchanan, Brown; Associate Professors Murray, Hammer; 
Assistant Professor Levine 

Major and minor work leading to the degrees of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy are offered. 

The student who elects his major in any field of bacteriology should 
present undergraduate credits in organic chemistry, one semester of phys- 
ics, the equivalent of Course 1 in Bacteriology, and an elementary course 
in the line in which he expects to major. Ordinarily a student must do 
two-thirds of his work in one of the lines of bacteriology above mentioned. 

The department, beginning with September, 1916, will be housed in the 
new Science Building in which provision for graduate as well as under- 
graduate instruction has been made. Studies for graduate students will 
be offered in the laboratories in this and other buildings in those phases 
of bacteriology which have important relations to agriculture, home eco- 
nomics, the industries, sanitary engineering, and veterinary medicine. 

The research problems that are now receiving attention are identifica- 
tion and classification of organisms of importance in sewage disposal, the 
recognition of sewage pollution, the disposal of creamery waste, the or- 
ganisms responsible for silage preservation, the influence of various bread 
ingredients upon the yeasts used in bread making, the bacteria and yeast 



20 IQWA STATE COLLEGE 

responsible for the spoiling of foods, crown gall of the apple, and diseases 
of the honey hee. 

The Department of Bacteriology maintains a seminar which meets 
weekly and has for its object the discussion of current literature in its 
field of bacteriology. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Agricultural Bacteriology; Advanced Agricultural Bacteriology: Seminars; Veter- 
inary Pathogenic Bacteriology; Immunity and Serum Therapy; Zymotechnique and 
Household Bacteriology; Dairy Bacteriology; Industrial Sanitary Bacteriology Re- 
search in any of the preceding lines. See page J2.">, Genera] Catalog. 

Botany 

Professor Pammel ; Associate Professors Martin, Melhus; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Bakke 

The department offers major and minor work for the degrees, Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in those fields of Botany which find 
their application in agriculture, horticulture, forestry, and the industries. 
For this purpose graduate and research work in vegetable pathology, 
morphology, physiology, systematic and economic botany are offered. 

Some of the research work receiving special attention at this time is 
alfalfa and clover pollination studies, the distribution of forest trees, 
transpiration of plants, honey plants of Iowa, rust investigations, fusarium 
disease of corn, crown gall, cabbage yellows, clover and alfalfa diseases, 
and corn root moulds. 

The Department of Botany maintains a seminar which is composed of 
the members of the department and the advanced students. The object of 
this seminar is the discussion of recent botanical literature and the presen- 
tation of papers by the members. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Plant Emhryogeny; Botany of Weeds; Evolution of Plants; General and Experi- 
mental Morphology ; Methods of Histology ; Cytology and Methods of Histology ; Fungi ; 
Physiology, Ecology, Agrostology; Systematic Botany; Dendrology; Mycology; Vegetable 
Pathology; Range and Poisonous Plants; Botanical Seminars; Cytology ; Advanced 
course in Thallophytes ; Applied Botany; Microscopical Examination of Foods; Seed 
Testing; Poisonous Plants; Pathological Physiology; Research. See page 131 in 
General Catalog. 

Ceramics 

Professor Beyer; Associate Professor Staley; Assistant Professor Galpin 

The department offers major and minor work for the degee of Master 
of Science along the lines of ceramic technology of crude and fine clay 
products, the technology of glass and enamel making, the geology of clays 
and ceramic materials, microscopic study of clays, and ceramic materials 
and cement making. 

The Department of Ceramics maintains a clay working laboratory 
equipped with up-to-date machinery ; kiln rooms with both up- and down- 
draft experimental kiln using solid fuel, and a pottery kiln in which oil is 
burned ; a drying and physical testing room with all the necessary utensils 
for making up and testing clays and other ceramic materials; and a gas 



GR \IH \TK DIVISION 21 

and fuel testing room equipped with an improved Elliott apparatus for 
gas analysis, a Parr calorimeter for solid fuels, a Junker calorimeter for 
gas and oils, l.e Chatelier electric, a Wanner optical, and a Brown metallic 
pyrometer. 

The following studies are open to gradutes : 

Ceramic Lectures; Ceramic Design; Special Problems; and Research in the above 
lines ( if work. s»-c page lto. Genera] Catalog. 

For the professional degree of Ceramic Engineer see page 16. 

Chemical Engineering 
Professors Beyer, Coover; Associate Professor Mann 

Students majoring for advanced degrees in other departments of the 
Engineering, Industrial Science, and Agricultural Divisions may minor in 
chemical engineering. At the present time the department is not offering 
all of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science. 

The Chemical and Engineering Departments are provided with facil- 
ities for investigation of manufacturing problems and for conducting in- 
dustrial research according to a practical system of cooperation between 
science and industry. These facilities are open to graduate students in 
chemical engineering. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Industrial Chemistry; The Chemistry of the Manufacture of Foods; Chemical 
Machinery; Applied Electrochemistry; Municipal Chemistry; and Research in Manu- 
facturing Problems. See pag;e 145 in General Catalog. 

For the professional degree of Chemical Engineer see page 16. 

Chemistry 

College Department Staff: Professor Coover; Associate Professors Fow- 
ler, Mann, Test, Wilkinson, Renshaw ; Assistant Professor Bu- 
chanan. Agricultural Experiment Station Staff: 
Chief Dox. Engineering Experiment Sta- 
tion Staff: Chief Coye. 

The Department of Chemistry offers major and minor work for the 
Master's and Doctor's degrees in those fields of chemistry applicable to 
agriculture, engineering, home economics, veterinary medicine, and the in- 
dustries. 

In the Agricultural Experiment Station thesis work is offered in agri- 
cultural and biological chemistry. In the Engineering Experiment Station 
thesis work is offered in industrial chemistry and the chemistry of road 
materials. 

The department now occupies its new building wherein adequate 
provision has been made for research laboratories and for a department 
library which contains fairly complete files of all the more important 
chemical periodicals as well as a large and well selected collection of 
books on the different phases of the subject. 

Besides the departmental seminar which meets every week for the dis- 
cussion of recent developments and publications in the above fields, there 



22 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

is a local section of the American Chemical Society which meets about 
once a month, and a Chapter of the Phi Lambda Upsilon fraternity which 
holds monthly meetings to discuss current literature and investigations. 

The following studies are open to graduates: 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry; Research in Applied Inorganic Chemistry; Ad- 
vanced Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis; Research in Analytical Chemistry 
Applied Physical Chemistry; Electro-chemistry; Research in Applied Physical Chem 
istry; Analysis of Carbon Compounds; Manufacture of Fine Organic Chemicals 
Applied Organic Chemistry; Research in Applied Organic Chemistry; Food Analysis; 
Research in Food Analysis; Dairy Chemistry; Sanitary Chemistry; Agricultural Chem 
istry; Research in Agricultural Chemistry; Physiological Chemistry; Research in 
Metabolism; Industrial Chemistry; Chemical Machinery; and Municipal Chemistry; 
Textiles; Animal and Plant Chemistry; Research in Physiological Chemistry; Research 
in Industrial Chemistry. See page 148, General Catalog. 

Civil Engineering 

Professors Kirkham, King, Agg; Associate Professors Evinger, Crum 

The department offers major work for the degree of Master of Sci- 
ence in Civil Engineering along the lines of masonry structures and ex- 
perimental engineering, railway engineering, structural engineering, hy- 
draulic and sanitary engineering, masonry design, highway engineering; 
and minor and supporting work in the other departments of the Engineer- 
ing, Agricultural, and Industrial Science Divisions. Students may there- 
fore major in civil engineering and minor in any department of the Agri- 
cultural and Industrial Science Divisions which offers a correlated line 
of work, and vice versa. 

The Department of Civil Engineering occupies nine rooms in the 
Engineering Hall, eight rooms in the Structural and Hydraulics Labora- 
tory, four rooms in the Engineering Annex, and the entire Transportation 
Building. Included within the eleven engineering buildings there are the 
following laboratories and drafting rooms: the cement laboratory; the 
structural materials laboratories ; the hydraulics laboratory ; laboratory 
for testing non-bituminous road materials ; the bituminous materials lab- 
oratory; and six large drafting rooms. The equipment for advanced work 
in these laboratories is of the best on the market and is sufficient to ac- 
commodate many graduate engineering students. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Water Purification; Sewage Treatment and Municipal Wastes Disposal; Elements 
of City Planning; Seminars; Water Supply; Railway Design; Railway Operation; 
Advanced Structural Engineering; Road Materials; Experimental Work in Civil En- 
gineering; Masonry Design; Highway Engineering; Roads and Pavement Design; and 
Railway Engineering. See page 160 in General Catalog. 

For the professional degree of Civil Engineer see page 16. 

Dairying 

Professor Mortensen ; Associate Professor Hammer; Assistant Professor 

Rudnick 

The Department of Dairying offers major and minor work for the 
Master's degree along the lines of management of dairy plants, dairy 
bacteriology, and creamery products. 

Jn correlation with the fundamental sciences the department also offers 



GRADUATE DIVISION 23 

major ami minor work for the Doctor's degree in management of dairy 

plants and dairy bacteriology. 

The departmem occupies the entire four-story dairy building which 
contains the different laboratories equipped for investigation along the 
lines in which graduate work is offered. The dairy faculty and graduate 
Students hold regular conferences for the discussion of recent scientific 
literature ami practical developments in the field of dairying. 

The following studies are open to graduates: 

Factory Management; Fancy [ee Creams and Fees; Judging Dairy Products; Milk 
Testing and Inspection; Seminars; .Market Milk; Dairy Bacteriology; Research in 
Dairy Bacteriology, ice ('roam Making, Butter Making, and Creamery Management; 
Research. See page i~(» in General Catalog. 

Economic Science 

APPLIED ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Brindley ; Associate Professors Von Tungeln, Rankin; Instructor 

Maker 

The Department of Economic Science offers major and minor work 
for the Master's degree in those fields of Economic Science applicable to 
agriculture, engineering, home economics, veterinary medicine, and the in- 
dustries. 

The different libraries of the college contain many of the best reference 
works, journals, magazines, and government publications bearing on agri- 
cultural economics, engineering economics, and rural sociology. Research 
work in rural sociology is carried on during the summer. 

The department maintains an applied social science club in cooperation 
with the History Department. The purpose of this club is the discussion 
of current economic and social questions within the field of the depart- 
ment and the encouragement of research work. 

Studies along the following lines are open to graduates : 

Problems in Advanced Agricultural Economics; Marketing of Agricultural Pro- 
ducts; Rural Sociology; Economics of Business Engineering; Research. See page 
183 in General Catalog. 

Electrical Engineering 

Professor Fish; Associate Professors Bartholomew, Wright; Assistant 
Professors Robbins, Paine 

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers opportunity for major 
work leading to the degree of Master of Science in Electrical Engineering. 
The subjects offered are advanced theory of alternating currents, electric 
power transmission, electric railways, and advanced work on the operat- 
ing characteristics of electrical apparatus. 

Opportunity for minor work is also given to those majoring in other 
departments of Engineering and in the departments of the Industrial Sci- 
ence and Agricultural Divisions. 

The department has its offices in the Engineering Annex. The En- 
gineering Annex also contains the electrical laboratory with twenty- 



24 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

eight generators and motors of various manufacture, several transform- 
ers, over one hundred accurate instruments, mounted lamp banks, rheo- 
stats, choke coils, and other apparatus. A substation motor-generator 
set, which has a 100 horse-power, three-phase, 60 cycle, 1100-volt, 120 ; J- 
r. p. m. induction motor takes power from the College central power 
plant. To one end of the motor is coupled a 60-kilowatt, 125-volt. 
compound wound, direct-current generator and to the other end 
is coupled a 50-kilowatt, three-phase, 60-cycle 220 and 110-volt alternator. 
The various experimental machines consist of shunt, series, interpole, and 
compound wound generators and motors, alternating current synchronous 
and induction motors, revolving field alternators, and double current gen- 
erators. Individual switchboards are mounted with instruments and con- 
trol apparatus for student use. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Principles of Electrical Engineering ; Direct and Alternating Current Machinery; 
Seminars: and advanced work in the studies above mentioned. See page 1*7 in 
General Catalog. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Electrical Engineer, see 
page 16. 

Farm Management 
Professor Munger; Assistant Chief Lloyd 

Major and minor work leading to the Master's degree is offered by 
the department in farm management, including studies of farm tenancy, 
cost of production, and farm practice. 

Students who major in this department must have a baccalaureate 
degree in farm management from an institution of recognized standing. 

The business of farming requires special training in farm management 
to prepare investigators, teachers, and farm management demonstrators. 
The demand for men who are experts in these fields of work is large and 
it is becoming more and more necessary for students who intend to take 
up farm management work to have graduate training. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Research in Farm Tenancy and Cost of Production; Thesis; and Seminars. See 
page 201 in General Catalog. 

Forestry- 
Professors Beach, MacDonald; Associate Professor Morbeck 

The department offers a five year course leading to the degree of 
Master of Science in Forestry, and major and minor work for the Mas- 
ter's degree along the lines of forest protection, forest management, 
lumbering, and forest products. 

The student entering upon the work for an advanced degree must 
have completed a four year course in forestry. 

Forestry is housed in Agricultural Hall where laboratory and class 
room space is afforded. The museum contains the collection of American 
woods which was exhibited by Iowa at the Centennial exposition; a large 
collection of South American and Philippine Island woods which were on 



GRADUATE DIVISION 25 

display at the Louisiana Purchase exposition; a large number of trunk 
specimens of trees; and about 800 lantern slides. The College has a 100- 
acre woods tract which serves as a demonstration area and 150 different 
species of trees are found on the campus. 

The following studies are open to graduates: 

Advanced Foresl Management; Advanced Foresl Regeneration; Forestry Research; 
Wood Structure; Grading Lumber; Foresl Protection; Foresl Valuation; Timber 
Preservation; Municipal Forestry; Economic Woods; Silviculture; Lumbering; Forest 
Products. See pace 204 in General Catalog. 

Geology 
Professor Beyer; Assistant Professor Galpin 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's degree 
along those lines in which geology has an intimate relationship to mining 
engineering, soil formation, etc. The department also offers major work 
for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the fields of economic geology 
and petrology. 

The museum contains several selected series of fossils, minerals, rocks 
and ores, from the different sections of the United States. Among these 
are the series of rocks collecteed by the United States Geological Survey; 
the series of rocks and minerals collected by the Smithsonian Institution; 
the Calvin series of paleozoric fossils; the Coastal Plain fossils from New 
Jersey, Alabama, Maryland and Virginia; The English mineral collection; 
the Permo-Carboniferous series from Kansas and Russia, and from the 
coal plants of Iowa, Illinois, and Pennsylvania; a large series of lead and 
zinc ores from the different fields in the United States; .and the Dr. H. 
Foster Bain series of rocks and minerals. 

The laboratory is equipped for scientific study in the lines in which 
major work is offered. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Petrology; Optical and Physical Mineralogy; Petrography; Topographic and Geol- 
ogic Mapping and Economic work; Economic Geology; Strategraphic Geology; and 
Cartography. See page 217 in General Catalog. 

Home Economics 

Professor MacKay; Associate Professors Russell, Gettemy, Monsch ; As- 
sistant Professor Schermerhorn 

The department offers minor work for the Master's degree along the 
lines of dietetics, theory of practice, sewing, and applied art. The de- 
partment offers no major work for the Master's degree, but a student with 
a major in any department of the Industrial Science Division may minor 
in Home Economics. 

The department occupies the entire three story Home Economics Build- 
ing and it has had, during the past year, nearly six hundred students. 

The studies which may be chosen as minors in graduate work are : 

Nutrition and Dietetics; Theory and Practice of Teaching Home Economics; Ad- 
vHnced Dressmaking; Millinery; Costume and Textile Design; Home Architecture and 
Sanitation; and History of Art. See page 225 in General Catalog. 



26 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Horticulture 

Professor Beach; Chiefs Erwin, Greene; Associate Professor Culley 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's degree 
along the lines of general horticulture, pomology, truck crops, landscape 
gardening, and floriculture; and major and minor work for the Doctor's 
degree along the lines of plant breeding and pomology. 

The student who elects horticulture as his major is expected to have 
taken as undergraduate work the equivalent of a course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Horticulture in a standard institution. 

To aid in practical and scientific investigation the department has on 
the campus and college farm about sixty acres devoted to orchards, nur- 
series, vineyards, and gardens. The Horticultural Experiment Station has 
the management of a twenty-three acre orchard at Council Bluffs, which is 
especially valuable for departmental work. The new plant laboratory 
building and greenhouses which are fully equipped and which supply 
30,000 feet under glass, give exceptional advantages for research study. 
In this new building a special research laboratory has been arranged for 
advanced investigational work. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Plant Breeding; Research in Plant Breeding; Fruit Farm Management; Advanced 
Floriculture ; Research in Floriculture ; Market Gardening ; Research in Pomology, 
Truck Crops ; Truck Farm Management, Special Problems, Research, Landscape Gar- 
dening, Special Problems, Landscape Design, Maintenance and Construction, Shade 
and Park Tree Management. See page 234 in General Catalog. 

Mathematics 

Professors Stanton, Roberts; Associate Professors Colpitts, Pattengill, 
Chaney, Snedecor; Dr. Tappan 

The Department of Mathematics offers major and minor work for the 
Master's degree in the special fields of this college. 

The subjects offered are so correlated to the different lines of work as 
to merit consideration of those students who expect to become teachers 
and investigators in applied mathematics. 

By special arrangements students majoring in mathematics may minor 
in engineering, physics, chemistry, or any of the biological sciences, if the 
work in such sciences is mathematical in character. 

To stimulate an interest in higher mathematics and current mathemat- 
ical literature a colloquium composed of members of the department and 
advanced students holds regular meetings. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Theory of Equations; Determinants and Advanced Analytic Geometry; Advanced 
Spherical Trigonometry; History of Mathematics; Advanced Differential and Integral 
Calculus; The Theory of Functions; Differential Equations; Projective Geometry; 
Higher Algebra; Infinite Series; Mathematical Theory of Statistics; Mathematics as 
Applied to Economic Problems; Theoretical Mechanics; Theory and Applications of 
Vector Analysis; Advanced Dynamics; Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics; 
and the Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. See page 256 in General 
Catalog. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 27 

Mechanical Engineering 
Professor Meeker; Associate Professors Cleghorn, Major, Norman 

The department offers major work for the degree of Master of Science 
in Mechanical Engineering along the lines of gas engineering, steam 
engineering, heating and ventilation, machine designing, railway mechanical 
engineering, automobile engineering ; and minor and supportng work in 
the other departments of the Engineering, Agricultural, and Industrial 
Science Divisions. 

The general offices of the department are in the Engineering Hall. 
The lecture and drafting and blue-print rooms are in the Engineering Hall 
and Engineering Annex. The department occupies the Steam and Gas 
Laboratory Building; the Locomotive Building; Machine Shop Building; 
Forge Shop Building ; and the Foundry and Pattern Shop Building. The 
Steam and Gas Laboratory has a 150 H. P. cross compound Nordberg en- 
gine ; a 535 cubic foot air compressor; a Kerr Steam Turbine connected to 
a 35 kilowatt. 220 volt alternating current generator ; three other steam en- 
gines of different types; condensers, various types of air brakes; several 
types of steam and power pumps ; a 50 H. P. suction gas producer and en- 
gine; four gas engines; one oil engine; a 1000 lb. refrigerating machine; 
all necessary small apparatus ; a 50,000 lb. Olsen Testing machine ; a 2,500 
foot pound Olsen Torsion machine ; and an American Type eight wheel 
locomotive given the College by the C. & N. W. Ry. Co. for testing pur- 
poses. The Machine Shop, Forge Shop, Foundry and Pattern Shop are 
each well equipped for scientific work. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Mechanics of Engineering; Hydraulics; Heating Design; Machine Work; Sem- 
inars; Machine Design; Steam Engines and Boilers; Power Plant Engineering; Steam 
and Gas Laboratory ; Crane Design ; Gas Engine Construction and Operation ; Gas 
Engine Design; Power Engineering; and Railway Mechanical Engineering. See page 
262 in General Catalog. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Mechanical Engineering, see 
page 16. 

Mining Engineering 
Professor Beyer; Associate Professor Hodson 

All of the subjects offered are required of undergraduates who spe- 
cialize in Mining Engineering and Metallurgy, but may be elected for 
minor work by graduates who are majoring along other lines. The de- 
partment does not, at the present time, offer major work for an advanced 
degree. 

The department occupies six rooms in Engineering Hall and six rooms 
in the Engineering Annex and Ceramics Building. The museum for 
geology and mining engineering is well equipped for the technical work of 
mining engineers. A complete Sullivan diamond drill prospecting outfit, 
a Water Leyner air drill, a complete set of miner's drills and tools, pros- 
pector's pans, picks, anemometers, barometers and clinometers, and mine, 
geological, and topographical maps of the most important mining districts 
add to the equipment. Wet and Dry metallurgical laboratories with the 
latest and best apparatus are maintained for all students. 



28 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Assaying; Mining Engineering; Metallurgy; and Seminars. Sec page 277 in 
General Catalog. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Engineer of Mines see 
page 16. 

Physics 

Professor Spinney; Associate Professors Stiles, Thompson; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Kunerth, Plagge 

Major and minor work leading to the degree of Master of Science is 
offered by the department in those fields of physics which are fundamental 
to the development of any line of work in the college. 

To encourage graduate and research work the Department of Physics 
maintains well equipped laboratories and a Colloquium composed of teach- 
ers and advanced students. The Colloquium meets once a week to discuss 
research work and recent articles and developments in the field of physics. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Mechanics; Heat and Light; Electricity and Magnetism; Advanced courses in 
Heat and Light; Illumination; Electron Theory and Radioactivity; History of Physics; 
Wave Motion and Sound ; Theory of Electricity and Magnetism ; Industrial Physics ; 
Theory of Light; Theory of Heat; Research. See page 295 in General Catalog. 

Structure Design 

Professor Kimball 

The department offers major and minor work for the degree of Mas- 
ter of Science along the lines of design of industrial structures, rural 
buildings, and the design and construction of tall office buildings. 

The Department of Structure Design offers work to students who wish 
to study interesting problems in building construction. The work is so 
arranged that many different classes of buildings are studied and worked 
out in detail. With the facilities offered in the way of valuable library 
material as well as the equipment of the shops it is possible to carry out 
many problems in design both from the practical and theoretical stand- 
points. The ultimate aim of the work is to give students the opportunity 
to make special application of the principles learned during the under- 
graduate course. 

The following studies are open to graduates : 

Special Interior Design; Advanced Design; Seminars; Elements of Structural 
Design as Applied to Agricultural Structure; Advanced Freehand Drawing; History 
of Structure Design; Industrial Structures; Sanitation of Buildings; and Estimating. 
See page 302 in General Catalog. 

Veterinary Anatomy 

Professor Murphey 

Major and minor work for the degree of Master of Science are offered 
by the department in histology and in gross anatomy. Minor work in 
anatomy is suggested for students majoring in animal nutrition, biological 
chemistry, pathology, physiology, and zoology. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 29 

The department is equipped to give instruction in the most scientific 
phases of anatomy to students ^i Veterinary Medicine or Animal Hus- 
bandry. The laboratories arc all well equipped. In Histology and Oste- 
ology each student is assigned an individual desk provided with a micro- 
scope, 100 permanent mounts n\ tissue, laboratory notes, and one-half 
skeleton oi disarticulated bones of the horse. A large and technically pre- 
pared list oi specimens is used in the class and laboratory demonstrations. 

The following studies are open to graduates. 

Osteology and Arthrology; Microscopy and Microscopic Anatomy; Myology and 
Splanchnology of the Horse; Microscopic Anatomy of tin* Organs of the Domestic 
Animals; Myology, Angiology, Neurology, Topography; Anatomy of Domestic An- 
imals; Comparative Anatomy; Research in Anatomy. Sec page 310 in General Cat- 
Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology 
Professor Dimock; Associate Professor Murray 

The department offers major and minor work leading to the Master's 
degree along the lines of systemic pathology, the pathology of specific 
infectious diseases, the pathology of sporadic diseases, tumors, chemical 
pathology, veterinary bacteriology, immunity and serum therapy. 

Students who major in veterinary bacteriology including immunity and 
serum therapy will classify with the Department of Bacteriology in the 
Industrial Science Division, but will do their work in the Department of 
Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology. Students who major in pathology 
will classify in the Department of Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology. 

The Department of Pathology and Bacteriology occupies the north- 
east building of the veterinary group. The building was planned and 
arranged for the work given in this department. Two offices open directly 
into a private laboratory which is used by the men in charge to investigate 
problems pertaining to their lines of work. A large general laboratory 
faces the north and has windows on the sides, supplying the best possible 
light for microscopic work. Each of the thirty individual desks in this 
laboratory has a plate glass top, making possible the perfect sanitary con- 
ditions necessary in handling infectious material. The desks are supplied 
with gas lamps, microscopes, and accessories necessary for carrying on 
work in both pathology and bacteriology. In connection with this labora- 
tory there are two well equipped preparation rooms, one devoted to work 
in pathology and the other to work in bacteriology. The department also 
has the use of a large class room which is provided with lantern slide 
and microscopic projection equipment. 

The following studies are open to graduates. 

General Pathology; Special Pathology; Advanced Pathology; Immunity and Serum 
Therapy; Research in Pathology; and Research in Bacteriology. See page 312 in 
General Catalog. 

Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology 

Associate Professor Bergman 

The department offers major work for the Master's degree along lines 
of investigation of physiological subjects relative to veterinary science; 



30 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

and minor and supporting work in physiology for graduate students in 
the Industrial Science Division or for agricultural students who are doing 
their major work along such lines as general nutrition, production prob- 
lems, feeding, breeding, etc. 

Students who major in physiology for an advanced degree must have 
had such previous training in physiology, and related subjects, such as 
anatomy, histology, chemistry, etc., as will permit of advanced study. 

The southeast building of the Veterinary group is devoted to the work 
in Physiology, Pharmacy, Materia Medica, and Therapeutics. The lab- 
oratories are well equipped for general and research work in physiology. 

The following studies are open to graduates. 

Comparative Physiology; Advanced Comparative Physiology; and Research in 
Physiology; Seminar. See page 314 in General Catalog. 

Zoology 

Professor Summers ; Associate Professors Guthrie, Bartholomew ; As- 
sistant Professors Harrison, Scullen, Ewing 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's degree 
along the lines of entomology, comparative physiology, invertebrate and 
vertebrate comparative anatomy; and major work for the Doctor's degree 
along the lines of entomology and comparative physiology. Majors in any 
of these lines are research work. 

The Department of Zoology embraces zoology and entomology. Be- 
ginning in the fall of 1916 zoology will be located on the second and third 
floors of the new Science Hall, while the entomology is housed in the 
Hall of Chemistry. The department maintains well equipped laboratories 
and libraries for graduate and research work, and a Zoology Club which 
meets weekly for the review of recent books and articles, and the presenta- 
tion of papers on original work. 

The following studies are open to graduates. 

Evolution of Animals; Vertebrate Comparative Anatomy; Morphology; Advanced 
Tnverteberate Comparative Anatomy; Advanced Entomology; Neurology; Economic 
Entomology; Orchard and Nursery Inspection; Literature of Entomology; Research 
in Entomology, Apiculture, Comparative Physiology, and Embryology 7 . See page 320 
in General Catalog. 

DEPARTMENTS OFFERING MINOR WORK ONLY 

The work in the following departments is undergraduate in character 
and is subordinate and auxiliary to the work of the departments which 
offer major lines. 

Agricultural Education 

Professor Wilson; Associate Professor Sealock ; Assistant Professors 
Schermerhorn, Gibson 

The department offers minor work in certain fundamental courses 
which should be taken by one who expects to teach technical subjects. 

The demand for the professional training of teachers has gradually 
extended upward through the grades and high school, until now many col- 



GRADUATE DIVISION 31 

leges give it consideration in the selection of members of the instructional 
staff. Because of the evident tendency to require professional training, 
any graduate student who expects to teach is urged to elect work in this 
department as a minor if he has not already completed at least fifteen 
hours oi such work. Students in this college who remain for a fifth year 
may well consider making this work one of the lines to be followed. 

The studies open, as minors only, to graduates are: 

Educational History: Vocational Education; School Administration; Methods and 
Practice Teaching; and Research in Agricultural Education. See page Hti in (Jen- 
oral Catalog. 

History 

Professor Cessna; Associate Professor Schmidt 

Students majoring for advanced degrees in agriculture or industrial 
science or applied economics and social science may minor in history. 
The department offers a number of specialized studies in economic his- 
tory, the chief purpose of which is to furnish an historical foundation for 
the study of the present day economic and social problems in industrial 
fields. 

The college and history seminar libraries contain the best standard 
reference works, journals, magazines, and government publications bearing 
on these subjects. 

The following studies, as minors only, are open to graduates : 

Economic History of American Agriculture ; Industrial History of England ; His- 
tory of Immigration to the Cnited States; Iowa History; History of Transportation 
in the United States; History of the United States as a World Power; Economic 
History of the United States, 1860-1880; Tariff History of the United States; and 
Research in Economic History. See page 222 in General Catalog. 

Psychology 

Professor Cessna; Assistant Professor Vance 

Students majoring for advanced degrees in agriculture or industrial 
science or applied economics and social science may minor in psychology. 
It is evident that all subjects involving the human element must be based 
on the knowledge of the laws of mental action. The study of psychology 
is regarded as necessary to the proper understanding of such problems as 
industrial development and efficiency, rural social uplift, etc. 

The following studies, as minors only, are open to graduates : 
Ethics; Social Psychology; Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence; Educational 
Psychology; Psychology of Business; The Animal Mind; and Physical and Mental 
Tests. See page 298 in General Catalog. 



W LIBRARY OF THE 
JAN « 1931 

,-• v * n i. • IS. 



. ' . 



^ /7// f0WA STATE COLLEGE 

OF 

AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS 



THE GRADUATE DIVISION 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
1917-1918 



ft. 




AMES, IOWA 



fry. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 

Vol. 16 AUGUST 22. 1917 No. 12 



THE GRADUATE DIVISION 



""-yiv ». 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

1917-1918 J/AA/& 



AMES. IOWA 



Published weekly. Entered as second-class matter, October 26, 1915, at the Postoffice 
at Ames, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1904. 



The College 



The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts conducts 
work along five major lines: 

Agriculture 
Engineering 
Home Economics 
Industrial Science 
Veterinary Medicine 

The Graduate Division conducts advanced research and instruction in 
all these five lines. 

Four, five, and six year collegiate courses are offered in different divi- 
sions of the College. Non-collegiate courses are offered in agriculture, 
engineering, and home economics. Summer Sessions include graduate, 
collegiate, and non-collegiate work. Short courses are offered in the 
winter. 

Extension courses are conducted at various point throughout the state. 

Research work is also conducted in the Agricultural and Engineering 
Experiment Stations and in the Veterinary Research Laboratory. 

Special announcements of the different branches of the work are sup- 
plied, free of charge, on application. The general college catalogue will 
be sent on request. 

Address Herman Knapp, Registrar, 

Ames, Iowa. 



Table of Contents 

PAGE 

The College ( Divisions and Activities) 2 

I owa State Board of Education 4 

College Calendar 5 

Facility of the Graduate Division 6 and 12 

The Graduate Committee 11 

General Information 12 

History and Organization 12 

General Statement 12 

Aims and Methods 13 

Fees and Expenses 13 

Clubs and Societies 14 

Honorary Fraternities 14 

Admission 14 

Classification 15 

Degrees 16 

The Master's Degree 16 

The Master's Degree partly in absentia 17 

Advanced Standing 17 

The Doctor's Degree 17 

The Professional Degrees 20 

Fellowships and Scholarships 21 

Graduate Study by Members of Staffs 21 

Departments Offering Graduate Instruction 22 

PAGE PAGE 

Agricultural Education 22 Farm Management 35 

Agricultural Engineering 22 Forestry 35 

Animal Husbandry 22 Geology 36 

Architectural Engineering and Home Economics 37 

Rural Structures 23 Horticulture 37 

Bacteriology and Hygiene 24 Mathematics 38 

Botany 25 Mechanical Engineering 39 

Ceramics 27 Mining Engineering 40 

Chemical Engineering 28 Physics 40 

Chemistry 28 Veterinary Anatomy 40 

Civil Engineering 31 Veterinary Pathology and 

Dairying 31 Bacteriology 41 

Economic Science 32 Veterinary Physiology and 

Electrical Engineering 33 Pharmacology 41 

Farm Crops and Soils 33 Zoology 42 

Departments Offering Minor Work Only 43 

History 43 

Psychology 44 



Iowa State Board of Education 

D. D. Murphy, President Elkader 

W. H. Gemmill, Secretary Des Moines 

MEMBERS OF BOARD 

TERMS EXPIRE JULY 1, 1919 

P. K. Holbrook Onawa 

Chas. R. Brenton Dallas Center 

D. D. Murphy Elkader 

TERMS EXPIRE JULY 1, 1921 

Paul Stillman Jefferson 

Edw. P. Schoentgen Council Bluffs 

Frank F. Jones Villisca 

TERMS EXPIRE JULY 1, 1923 

Geo. T. Baker Davenport 

H. M. Eicher Washington 

Willard C. Stuckslager Lisbon 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Faculty Committee— D. D. Murphy, P. K. Holbrook, H. M. Eicher, Paul 

E. Stillman, W. C. Stuckslager. 
Building and Business Committee — Chas. R. Brenton, D. D. Murphy, Edw. 

P. Schoentgen, Geo. T. Baker, F. F. Jones. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

W. R. Boyd, Chairman Cedar Rapids 

Thos. Lambart Sabula 

W. H. Gemmill, Secretary Des Moines 

INSPECTORS OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

*P. E. McClenahan, Inspector Des Moines 

John E. Foster, Inspector Des Moines 

* Absent on leave. 



The College Calendar 

1917-1918 
As Applicable to the Graduate Division 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 6-7 — Entrance examinations. 

September 10-11 — Registration of graduate students. 

September 12, 7:40 a.m. — Lectures begin. 

September 15, 8:00 p. m.— Y. W. C. A. & Y. M. C. A. reception. 

November 29 — Thanksgiving vacation. 

December 19, 12:00 m. — Christmas vacation begins. 

January 2, 12:00 if. — Vacation closes. 

January 25, 12:00 m. — First semester closes. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

January 31-February 1 — Entrance examinations. 

February 4-5 — Registration of graduate students. 

February 6, 7:40 a. m. — Lectures begin. 

February 9, 8:00 p. m.— Y. W. C. A. & Y. M. C. A. reception. 

March 28, 12:00 m. — Easter vacation begins. 

April 1, 5:00 p.m. — Easter vacation closes. 

May 1, 12:00 m. — Latest day for receipt by Dean of the Graduate Division 
of certified copies of Doctors' Theses. 

May 25, 12:00 m. — Latest day for receipt by Dean of the Graduate Di- 
vision of certified copies of Masters' Theses. 

June 2, Sunday, 10:30 a.m. — Baccalaureate sermon. 

June 4, Tuesday, 9:30 a.m. — Alumni business meeting. 

June 5, Wednesday, 1 :00 p. m. — Alumni, faculty, senior banquet. 

June 6, Thursday, 10:30 a.m. — Commencement. 

June 6, Thursday, 2:30 p.m. — President's reception. 

SUMMER SESSION 

June 10, Monday, 7 :00 a. m. — Summer session begins. 
August 29, Thursday, 12:00 m. — Summer school closes. 

1918-1919 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 5-6 — Entrance examination. 
September 9-10 — Lectures begin. 



Faculty of the Graduate Division 

President and Deans 

Raymond Allen Pearson. 1912 President 

B. S. in Agr., Cornell University, 1894; M. S. in Agr., 1899; LL.D., 
Alfred University, 1909; D. of Agr., University of Nebraska, 1917. 

Edgar Williams Stanton. **1877, 1873 Vice-President, Dean of the 

Junior College, Professor of Mathematics 
B. Sc., Iowa State College, 1872; M. Sc, 1887; LL.D, Coe College, 
1904. 

Charles Franklin Curtiss. 1897, 1891 Dean of the Division of 

Agriculture, Director of Experiment Station 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1887; M. S. A., 1892; D. S. in Agri- 
culture, Michigan Agricultural College, 1907. 

Anson Marston. 1892 Dean of the Division of Engineering, Professor 

C. E., Cornell University, 1899. of Civil Engineering 
Charles Henry Stange. 1909, 1907 Dean of the Division of Veterinary 

Medicine, Professor of Veterinary Theory and Practice 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1907. 

Robert Earle Buchanan. 1909-1904 Dean of the Division of Industrial 

Science, Professor of Bacteriology 
B. S. f Iowa State College, 1904; M. S, 1906; Ph. D., Chicago Uni- 
versity, 1908. 

Catharine J. MacKay. 1911, 1910 Dean of the Division of Home 

Economics, Professor of Home Economics 
Diploma, Drexel Institute, 1907; Boston Cooking School, 1907; Teach- 
ers' College, Columbia University, 1910, 1914. 

Professors 

Spencer Ambrose Beach. 1905 Vice-Dean of the Division of 

Agriculture, Professor of Horticulture 
B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1887; M. S, 1892. 

Harold Edward Bemis. 1913, 1908 Vice-Dean of the Division of 

Veterinary Medicine, Professor of Veterinary Surgery 
D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1908. 

Henry Dale Bergman. 1916, 1910 Professor of Physiology and 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1910. Pharmacology 

Samuel Walker Beyer. 1898, 1891. .. .Vice-Dean of the Division of Engi- 
neering, Professor of Geology and Mining Engineering 
B. S., Iowa State College, 1889; Ph. D, Johns Hopkins Univ., 1895. 

* The Grachiato Faculty is composed of the president, deans, heads of departments 
in which graduate instruction is authorized, and other members of the faculties who 
are in charge of graduate instruction. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 7 

John Edwin Brindley. 1913, 1907 Professor of Economics 

B. L., University of Wisconsin, 1902; A. M., 1906; Ph. D., University 

of Iowa, 1911. 
Percy Edgar Brown. 1914, 1910 Professor of Soil Bacteriology 

B. Sc, Rutgers College, 1906; A. M., 1909; Ph. D., 1912. 
Orange Howard Cessna. 1900 Professor of History and Psychology 

B. S, Iowa State College, 1872; B. D., Garrett Biblical Institute, 1885; 

D. D„ 1900; A. M., Cornell College, 1901. 
Winf red Forest Coover. 1913, 1914 Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., Otterbein University, 1900; A. M., Ohio State University, 1903. 
Martin Francis Paul Costelloe. 1916, 1911 Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 

B. S. in C. E., University of Nebraska, 1906; A. E., 1916. 
William Wallace Dimock. 1911, 1909 Professor of Veterinary 

Pathology and Bacteriology 

B. Agr., Connecticut Agricultural College, 1901; D. V. M., Cornell 

University, 1905; D. V. M., University of Habana, 1907. 
Fred Alan Fish. 1907, 1905 Professor of Electrical Engineering 

M. E. in E. E., Ohio State University, 1898. 
Bernard Wernick Hammer. 1916, 1911. . .Professor of Dairy Bacteriology 

B. S. A., University of Wisconsin, 1908. 
Harald De Mott Hughes. 1910 Professor of Farm Crops 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1907 ; M. S. A., Univ. of Missouri, 1908. 
Gilmour Beyers MacDonald. 1913, 1910 Professor of Forestry 

B. S. F., University of Nebraska, 1907; M. F., 1914. 
Warren H. Meeker. 1907, 1891 Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

M. E., Cornell University, 1891. 
Martin Mortensen. 1909 Professor of Dairying 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1909. 
Harlan Bruce Munger, 1914 Professor of Farm Management 

B. S., Cornell University, 1912. 
Howard Sylvester Murphey. 1913, 1909 Professor of Veterinary 

D. V. M., Ohio State University, 1908. Anatomy and Histology 
Louis Hermann Pammel. 1889 Professor of Botany 

B. Agr., University of Wisconsin, 1885; M. S., 1889; Ph. D., Wash- 
ington University, St. Louis, 1898. 
William Harper Pew. 1912, 1909 Professor of Animal Husbandry 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1907. 
Maria M. Roberts. 1913, 1891 . .Vice-Dean of the Junior College, Professor 

B. L., Iowa State College, 1890. of Mathematics 

Louis Bevier Spinney. 1897, 1891 Professor of Physics 

B. M. E, Iowa State College, 1892; B. S. (E. E.), 1893. 
Homer Francis Staley. 1916, 1914 Professor of Ceramic Engineering 

B. A., Ohio State University, 1904. 
William Henry Stevenson. 1903, 1902 Professor of Agronomy, Vice- 
Director of Experiment Station 

A. B., Illinois College, 1893; B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1905. 



8 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

George Melvin Turpin. 1913 Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

B. S., in Agr., Utah Agricultural College, 1909. 
Guy Mitchell Wilson. 1913 Professor of Agricultural Education 

A. B., Indiana University, 1900; M. A., 1908. 

Associate Professors 

George Arthur Chaney. 1914, 1913. . .Associate Professor of Mathematics 
M. S., Highland Park College, 1906; M. A., Univ. of Wisconsin, 
1910; Sc. D., Highland Park College, 1917. 

Julia Trueman Colpitis. 1913, 1900. .Associate Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., Mount Allison University, Canada, 1899; A. M., Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1900. 

Frank Hamilton Culley. 1915, 1914 Associate Professor of Landscape 

Gardening 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1913; M. L. A., Harvard 
University, 1914. 

Henry Ellsworth Ewing. 1916, 1914. .Associate Professor of Entomology 

B. A., University of Illinois, 1906; M. A., 1908; Ph. D., Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1911. 
Evan F. Ferrin. 1913, 1911. . .Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry 

B. S. in A. H., Iowa State College, 1911. 
Genevieve Fisher. 1915, 1914 Associate Professor of Agricultural 

B. S., Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1914. Education 

Chester Charles Fowler. 1913, 1909 Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B. S. in Chem. Eng., University of Illinois, 1909; M. S., 1913; Ph. D., 

Jefferson Medical College, 1915. 
Joseph Edward Guthrie. 1913, 1902 Associate Professor of Zoology 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1900; M. S., 1901. 
Frank M. Harrington. 1916, 1913. .. .Associate Professor of Horticulture 

B. S., Oregon Agricultural College, 1913. 
Kenneth Cole Ikeler. 1915 Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry 

M. E., Pennsylvania Normal, 1909; B. S., Pennsylvania State College, 

1913 ; M. S., Iowa State College, 1914. 
William Kunerth. 1916, 1907 Associate Professor of Physics 

M. A., University of Wisconsin, 1910. 
Orren Lloyd-Jones. 1914, 1913. .Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1908; M. S., 1911; Ph. D., 1913. 
Charles August Mann. 1916 Associate Professor of Chemical Engr. 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1909; M. S., 1911; Ph. D., 1915. 
John Nathan Martin. 1912, 1911 Associate Professor of Botany 

A. B., Indiana University, 1907; Ph. D., University of Chicago, 1913. 
Irving E. Melhus. 1916 Associate Professor of Plant Pathology 

B. Sc, Iowa State College, 1906; Ph. D., University of Wisconsin, 1912. 
Ernest Muchmore Mervine. 1915, 1912 Associate Professor of Agri- 

M. E., University of Lehigh, 1909. cultural Engineering 



GRADUATE DIVISION 9 

Helen Monsch. 1915 Associate Professor of Domestic Science 

B. S., Kansas Agricultural College, 1904; B. S., University of Chicago, 

1909; A. M., Columbia University, 1916. 
George Chester Morbeck. 1914, 1912 Associate Professor of Forestry 

B. S. in Forestry. Michigan Agricultural College, 1904; M. F., 1915. 
Charles Murray. 1913, 1908. .. .Associate Professor of Veterinary Path- 
ology and Bacteriology 

Pe. B., Drake University, 1906; B. S., Iowa State College, 1910; 

D. V. M., 1912. 
Charles Sabin Nichols. 1917, 1910. .Associate Professor Civil Engineering 

B. C. E., Iowa State College, 1909; C. E., 1914. 
Ernest Alanson Pattengill. 1914, 1900.. Assoc. Professor of Mathematics 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1897; B. S., Cornell University, 1899. 
John Owen Rankin. 1916. .. .Associate Professor of Economic Science 

A. B., Tarkio College, 1904; B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1908; A. M., 
George Washington University, 1912. 

Raemer R. Renshaw. 1914, 1913. .Assoc. Professor of Organic Chemistry 

B. S., University of Oregon, 1902; M. S., 1903; Ph. D., Columbia 
University, 1907. 

Arthur William Rudnick. 1916, 1913. .Associate Professor of Dairying 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1910. 
William Elmer Sealock. 1915 Associate Professor of Agricultural 

A. B., University of Ohio, 1905. Education 
Louis Bernard Schmidt. 1911, 1906 Associate Professor of History 

Ph. B., Cornell College, 1901 ; A. M., 1906. 
Phineas Stevens Shearer. 1914, 1912 Associate Professor of Animal 

B.S. in A. H., Iowa State College, 1912. Husbandry 

Roy Eugene Smith. 1914, 1909 Associate Professor of Soils 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1909; M. S., 1911. 

George Waddel Snedecor. 1914, 1913. .Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B. S., Univ. of Alabama, 1905; M. A., Univ. of Michigan, 1912. 
Harold Stiles. 1915, 1914 Associate Professor of Physics 

A. B., Kenyon College, 1896; A. M., Harvard University, 1904; Ph. 
D„ Northwestern University, 1909. 

Louis Agassiz Test. 1914, 1913 Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B. M. E., Purdue University, 1894; A. C, 1896; Ph. D, University of 
Chicago, 1907. 

George Ellsworth Thompson. 1915, 1914. . .Associate Professor of Physics 

A. B., Indiana University, 1909; A. M., 1910; Ph. D., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1913. 

George Henry Von Tungeln. 1914, 1913.. Assoc. Prof, of Rural Sociology 
Ph. B., Central Westleyan College, 1909; M. A., Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1910. 

Henry William Vaughan. 1914, 1913.. Assoc. Prof, of Animal Husbandry 

B. S. in Agr., Ohio State University, 1908; M. S. in Agr., 1909. 
John Anderson Wilkinson. 1914, 1913 Associate Professor of Physical 

Chemistry and Inorganic Analysis 
B. Sc, Ohio State University, 1903 ; Ph. D., Cornell University, 1909. 



10 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Assistant Professors 

Ross Leon Bancroft. 1915 Assistant Professor of Soils 

B. S., University of Wyoming, 1914; M. S., Iowa State College, 1915. 
Arthur Laurence Bakke. 1913, 1910 Assistant Professor of Botany 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1909; M. S., 1911. 
John Hall Buchanan. 1915, 1911 Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1911 ; M. S., 1915. 
Eric Eyre Eastman. 1916, 1913 Assistant Professor of Soils 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1913; M. S., 1915. 
Sidney Longman Galpin. 1913 Assistant Professor of Geology 

A. B., Western Reserve University, 1907; A. M., Cornell University, 
1910; Ph. D., 1912. 

Heber Howard Gibson. 1915 Assistant Professor of Agricultural 

Education 
A. B., Denison University, 1909; M. A., Columbia University, 1912. 
Lester S. Gillette. 1915, 1914 Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

B. S. in A. H., Iowa State College, 1913; A. M., University of Mis- 
souri, 1914. 

Arthur John Hauser. 1916, 1913 Assistant Professor of Dairying 

B. S. in Agr., Pennsylvania State College, 1911. 
Max Levine. 1914, 1913. .Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Hygiene 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1912. 
Herman A. Scullen. 1914 Assistant Professor of Zoology 

A. B., University of Oregon, 1910. 

Arthur S. Thurston. 1916 Assistant Professor of Horticulture 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1914; M. Sc, 1916. 

Instructors 

Walter Earl Baker, A. B Economic Science, 1916 

*Ada Hayden, B. S., M. S. Instructor in Botany, 1910 

A. Helen Tappan, A. B., A. M., Ph. D Instructor in Mathematics, 1915 

Alexander Vasey Arragon, A. B., A. M Instructor in History, 1915 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

Arthur Wayland Dox, B. S., A. M., Ph. D Chief in Chemistry 

A. T. Erwin, M. S Chief in Truck Crops 

John Marcus Evvard, M. S Assistant Chief in Animal Husbandry 

Orson Gunnell Lloyd, B. S., M. S.. Assistant Chief in Farm Management 

Robert Lorenzo Webster, A. B Acting Chief in Entomology 

Laurenz Greene, B. S., M. S. A Chief in Pomology 

Ralph Sydney Potter, A. B., M. S., Ph. D Assistant Chief in Soil 

* Absent on leave. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 11 

THE GRADUATE COMMITTEE 

Raymond Allen Pearson, M. S. in Agr., LL.D., D. of Agr., President and 
Acting Dean. 

George Arthur Chaney, B. S., M. S., A. M. f Sc. D., Associate Professor of 
Mathematics, Secretary of the Committee, and Assistant to the Acting 
Dean. 

William Henry Stevenson, A. B., B. S. A., Professor and Head of the De- 
partment of Farm Crops and Soils. 

Samuel Walker Beyer, B. S., Ph. D., Professor and Head of the Depart- 
ments of Geology, Mining, and Ceramic Engineering. 

William Wallace Dimock, B. Agr., D. V. M., Professor and Head of the 
Department of Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Miss Catharine J. MacKay, Diploma, Drexel Institute, Boston Cooking 
School, Teachers' College, Columbia University, Professor and Dean 
of the Division of Home Economics. 

Louis Hermann Pammel, B. Agr., M. S., Ph. D., Professor and Head of 
the Department of Botany. 



Graduate Division 

President Raymond A. Pearson, Acting Dean 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

The instruction and training of graduate students has been one of the 
functions of the Iowa State College since its early history. The first de- 
gree of Master of Science was conferred in 1877. In 1879 the first degree 
of Civil Engineer and the first degree of Master of Philosophy were con- 
ferred. In early years the department or departments in which the student 
was registered mapped out the applicant's course and supervised his work. 
Later, when the divisions of the College had been created, each division 
controlled its own graduate work. It was not long, however, until the 
number of graduate students and the diversified character of their work 
demanded further organization, and a Graduate Committee was appointed 
to supervise the work of all graduate students. This Committee was in 
charge until 1913 when the increase in the graduate work made it neces- 
sary to perfect still further the organization, and the Graduate Division 
was established. The Graduate Division is administered by the President 
of the College as Acting Dean and the Graduate Faculty. Under this 
organization the graduate work to be pursued in any case is under the 
Acting Dean, the head of the department, and the professor in charge of 
the work. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts offers major 
and minor work for the degree of Master of Science in the following sub- 
jects with special application to the industries: agricultural education, ani- 
may husbandry, bacteriology, botany, chemistry, dairying, economics, engi- 
neering, farm crops and soils, farm management, forestry, geology, horti- 
culture, mathematics, physics, veterinary anatomy, veterinary pathology, 
veterinary physiology, and zoology. Graduate instruction leading to the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy is also offered in farm crops and soils, 
animal husbandry, bacteriology, botany, chemistry, dairying, geology, horti- 
culture, and zoology. Additional minor supporting work is offered in 
other departments to supplement graduate study along technical lines. 

FACULTY 

The president, the deans, the heads of the departments in which grad- 
uate instruction is authorized, and other members of the faculties who are 
in immediate charge of graduate instruction arc members of the Graduate 
Faculty. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 13 

AIMS AND METHODS 

This is an age of great commercial, scientific, and social interests, and 
these interests are demanding greater economy, specialization in science, 
and more hnmanitarianism. To meet these demands the leaders in the 
different lines of industry, science, and social affairs must have access to 
more specialized training than can be secured in four years of study. 
The man who would be a successful competitor as an expert in any of the 
different lines of agriculture, or as a skilled chemist, engineer, botanist, 
bacteriologist, applied economic science expert, or as a teacher or inves- 
tigator in any of these subjects can by graduate training so increase his 
efficiency as to open up opportunities otherwise denied him. The develop- 
ment of scientific agriculture, engineering, manufacturing, and all the sup- 
porting sciences is dependent upon this training. A greater Iowa, econom- 
ically and socially, is impossible without it. The Iowa State College has 
long since realized its responsibility in the further development of the 
many lines of research work in harmony with the industrial needs of the 
commonwealth. 

Lectures, laboratory work, and seminar methods in which the student 
in in contact with his research problems are used in the development of 
the graduate work. The investigative work is shared by instructor and 
student, and the student acquires the spirit as well as the methods of pro- 
ductive work. To further encourage this spirit of research, provision has 
been made for the publication of specially meritorious work along some 
of the lines of investigation of which the institution has charge. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Incidental and Janitor Fee: The regular incidental and janitor fee 
for the semester is $12.00, but all students who classify during the classi- 
fication period, Friday and Saturday before College work begins, will be 
charged only $9.00 a semester. Graduate scholars and fellows are re- 
quired to pay a two-dollar hospital fee, a fee of one dollar for each hour's 
work up to seven hours, and laboratory fees in their minor only. 

Laboratory Fees. Laboratory fees at the actual cost of breakage and 
usage are charged to students, the Treasurer's receipt for the fee being 
required before the students are admitted to laboratories. Some fees rep- 
resent charges for mimeograph notes which are furnished at cost; usually 
when these notes are supplied no text book is required and the fee is in 
lieu of text book purchase. Deposits are required in some departments to 
cover the value of equipment loaned to students, and at the end of the 
term the amount is returned less deduction for loss and breakage. For 
the amount of the fee in any study the student should refer to the descrip- 
tion of studies under the department in which the study is taught. Schol- 
ars and fellows are exempt from laboratory fees in their major work. 

Diploma Fee: For the Master's, Doctor's, or Professional Degrees, 
$5.00. This does not include the cost of the Master's or Doctor's hood. 



14 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 

In the interest of research and investigation along the lines of applied 
science and for training in the presentation of results, several clubs and 
societies have been organized by the instructors and students in the dif- 
ferent departments. Among these are the following: 
Graduate Club. I. S. C. Branch of the American In- 

Iowa Section of American Society stitute of Electrical Engineers. 

of Agronomy. Chemistry Seminar. 

Botany Seminar. I. S. C. Branch of the American In- 

Physics Seminar. Institute of Mining Engineers. 

Applied Social Science Club. Civil Engineering Society. 

Mathematics Colloquium. I. S. C. Branch of the American So- 

Bacteriology Seminar. ciety of Agricultural Engineers. 

HONORARY FRATERNITIES 

The following is a list of the Honorary Fraternities of Iowa State 
College, some of which are maintaining regular programs along lines of 
research work: 

Phi Lambda Upsilon. Gamma Sigma Delta. 

Phi Kappa Phi. Omicron Nu. 

Alpha Zeta. Delta Sigma Rho. 
Tau Beta Pi. 

ADMISSION 

Graduates of Iowa State College, as well as graduates of other colleges 
and universities of approved standing, are admitted to the Graduate Di- 
vision. Before entering upon graduate work in any department, however, 
the applicant must present evidence that he has had the necessary pre- 
requisite training that will enable him to pursue with profit the courses de- 
sired. It should be remembered, also, that admission to graduate work 
does not necessarily imply admission to candidacy for a degree. 

Graduate students wishing to become candidates for the Master's or 
Doctor's degree will make application in writing to the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate Division not later than February 1 of the year in which the degree is 
sought. This application should be approved and signed by the head of the 
department in which the major subject is offered and by all other members 
of the faculty under whom the student has done work in support of his 
candidacy. If the applicant has completed any graduate work in another 
institution, an authorized statement of the same should be filed with the 
application for candidacy for degree. 

For the purpose of admission to the Graduate Division an approved col- 
lege or university is one which requires four years of work of collegiate 
grade for graduation, based upon an entrance requirement of at least four- 
teen standard high school units. 

Candidates for admission to the Graduate Division are required to sub- 
mit to the Registrar or Dean a complete authorized statement of their 



GRADUATE DIVISION 15 

college or university records, including a statement of their entrance 
credits. A blank application for admission which contains definite in- 
structions regarding admission may be secured from the Registrar or Dean. 

When an application has been approved, the Registrar issues a permit 
to enroll. Upon the payment of fees the candidate is given a receipt 
which he presents to the Dean, the classifying officer. 

Registration should be on regular classification days to avoid payment 
of extra fee, and it should be completed within two weeks after the open- 
ing of a semester to receive full credit for the semester's work. 

CLASSIFICATION 

The classification of all regular graduate students must be completed 
in conformity with the following rules : 

1. Fifteen credit hours each semester shall constitute full-time gradu- 
ate work. 

2. A major subject allowed by the rules of candidacy for the degree 
shall be chosen; all major, minor, and supporting work shall be outlined 
in consultation with the head of the department in which the major is 
taken. 

3. Unless otherwise specially permitted a graduate student shall carry 
at least one study of strictly graudate grade each semester. In any case 
at least four hours of strictly graduate work must be completed each year. 

4. The course of study as outlined shall not be amended or changed 
except by the approval of the Dean of the Graduate Division, and any 
such change shall be in writing and shall be filed with the original course 
of study. 

5. The courses of study as outlined shall be made out in triplicate : 
one shall be retained in the files of the department in which the major 
work is taken, one shall be filed in the office of the Dean of the Graduate 
Division, and one in the office of College Registrar. Each copy shall be 
signed by the head of the department in which the major work is taken, by 
the instructor who will have immediate charge of the major line of work, 
and by the Dean of the Graduate Division. 

6. In special cases a limited amount of credit may be given in sub- 
jects not catalogued as graduate studies where these are taken as minors 
and bear directly upon the major subjects and are recommended by the 
professor in charge of the major work and approved by the Dean. 

7. Graduate students who are not candidates for an advanced degree 
are not required to designate a major or a minor subject but may elect 
their work with a view to their special purpose. Any course of study in 
the Graduate Division is open for election by such students upon the same 
conditions that are imposed upon those who are candidates for a degree. 
If at any time such special students desire to become candidates for an 
advanced degree, due consideration and credit will be given for work al- 
ready done. 

Note: Any deficiency in Modern Language should be made up immediately. See 
requirements in Modern Language for advanced degrees. 



16 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

DEGREES 

The higher degrees conferred by the Iowa State College are the Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy for advanced work in the technical 
fields especially developed at this college; and the Professional Degrees of 
Civil Engineer (C. E.), Electrical Engineer (E. E.), Mechanical Engineer 
(M. E.), Engineer of Mines (E. M.), Ceramic Engineer (Cer. E.), Chem- 
ical Engineer (Ch. E.)> Agricultural Engineer (A. E.)> Master of Agri- 
culture (M. Agr.), and Master of Forestry (M. F.). 

THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

The degree of Master of Science may be conferred upon students who 
have completed work in compliance with the following provisions and re- 
quirements : 

1. At least one year must be spent in resident work. 

2. At least thirty credit hours or the equivalent must be completed, 
not less than half of which should be completed in this institution. 

3. A minimum of twenty credit hours shall be completed in the major 
work, and a maximum of ten credit hours in the minor work. Minor work 
is recommended, and it may be taken in the same department in which the 
major is taken; but both major and minor may not be taken under the 
same instructor. 

4. Major work may, upon special recommendation, be taken in two 
closely related subjects. In such a case a minor is optional. 

5. A satisfactory reading knowledge of French or German must be 
certified to by the head of the Department of Modern Languages prior 
to admission to examination. Upon the recommendation of the head of 
the department some other modern language may be substituted for French 
or German. 

6. Such subjects as are designated as "graduate and advanced under- 
graduate" or "graduate" will be credited toward the advanced degree. 
Major work will ordinarily be restricted to graduate subjects. See 6 under 
Classification. 

7. Examination shall be taken on all graduate work including thesis 
when thesis is required. This examination shall be oral or written as de- 
termined by the instructors concerned. 

8. Thesis is optional with the department in which the major work is 
taken. When a thesis is required it should be written in conformity with 
the following rules : 

a. The stock should be Brother Jonathan bonk, 8 l / 2 x 11. If for 
any reason this stock is difficult to obtain, it is very desirable that the 
stock used approximate closely that which is recommended. 

b. The right and left margins shall each be 1% inches. The top 
margin shall be V/z inches and the bottom margin shall be \}i inches. 

c. The following specimen title page for the master's thesis may be 
gotten at the office of the Dean of the Graduate Division. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 17 

THE PRODUCTION OF PURE LINES 
IN CEREALS 

BY 

JOHN ANTHONY KRALL 

A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE FACULTY OF THE 
IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND ME- 
CHANIC ARTS IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF 
THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 
OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
AGRONOMY 

AMES, IOWA • 
1916 

THE MASTER'S DEGREE PARTLY IN ABSENTIA 

Any graduate of Iowa State College or other institution of high stand- 
ing may be permitted to do one-half the required work for the Master's 
Degree in absentia as follows: 1. The applicant must be in residence at 
this institution during at least three six-weeks summer sessions. 2. Dur- 
ing the period of two consecutive years while not in residence at the Col- 
lege the candidate must pursue a course of advanced study previously ar- 
ranged by the head of the department in which the work is to be done and 
which has been approved by the Dean of the Graduate Division. This 
absentia work is expected to equal in amount that normally accomplished 
in three six-weeks summer sessions and is to lie along the line of his 
major work. Such special students are required to pass examinations on 
all work done at the College and in absentia. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Graduate students of approved colleges and universities who have com- 
pleted a portion of the requirements for the Master's or Doctor's degree 
in the technical lines developed at this institution, may be permitted to 
enroll as graduate students and finish their work for the desired degree. 
For the Master's degree at least one year of residence will be required, 
in which not less than fifteen credit hours of graduate work must be com- 
pleted. For the Doctor's degree at least one year of residence will be re- 
quired, in which not less than thirty credit hours of graduate work, in- 
clusive of dissertation, must be completed. 

THE DOCTOR'S DEGREE 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy may be conferred upon students 
who complete work in compliance with the following provisions and re 
quirements : 



18 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

1. Three years of graduate work are required, one of which must be 
spent at this institution. 

2. The degree will be conferred not solely as a result of a faithful 
study over any period, but for ability to do research work of a scholarly 
character and for the successful passing of all examinations. 

3. Major work shall be taken in one subject, or, in exceptional cases, 
in two closely related subjects. Two minors shall be taken when only one 
major is chosen, and one minor shall be taken when two majors are chosen. 

4. Minor work shall represent from one-fourth to one-third of the 
work for the degree. 

5. One minor must be taken outside the department in which the 
major is taken. 

6. A reading knowledge of French and German must be certified to 
by the head of the Department of Modern Languages at least one year 
prior to final examination. 

7. During the last two years of graduate work only such courses as 
are designated as "graduate" shall be credited on major work. 

8. A thesis which is a real contribution to knowledge along some line 
in which the major is taken must be completed. The rules and regulations 
governing the printing of Doctors' theses follow : 

a. The cover shall be identical in content with the title page. 

b. The general format of the thesis is as follows : Dimensions of 
letter press should approximately be 4x6^4, to be printed on stock, the 
exterior dimensions of which should be 6x9, trimmed. 

c. If the character of the material in the thesis is such as to require 
a larger page, then the dimensions of the letter press should approx- 
imately be Sy 2 x 7^4, to be printed on stock, the exterior dimensions of 
which should be 8>4xll, trimmed. 

d. The stock, or paper, on which the thesis is printed should be 

Coventry 
Antique Finish Laid 

Watermarked 

25x38 — 60 pounds 

White 

e. If, for any reason, this stock should be difficult to obtain, it is 
desirable that the stock used approximate very closely that which has 
been recommended. 

f. A sample of the following standard title page may be obtained 
from the office of the Dean of the Graduate Division for the guidance 
of the printer. Any further details regarding the printing of the thesis 
should be secured from the Dean of the Graduate Division. 



STUDIES ON THE 

PHENOLDISULPHONIC ACID METHOD FOR 

DETERMINING NITRATES IN SOILS 



BY 
CHARLES WESLEY DAVIS 



A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE FACULTY OF 
THE IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND ME- 
CHANIC ARTS IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF 
THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 
OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



NO. 2 



REPRINTED FROM THE 
JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY 

MARCH, 1917 



20 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

9. Not later than April 1st of the academic year in which the degree 
is sought, the candidate should have his thesis approved by the head of the 
department in which the major work has been taken, and submitted in 
typewritten form to the Dean of the Graduate Division. May 1st is the 
latest date for the transmittal of the thesis. 

10. Publication of the thesis by the candidate or by a scientific journal 
is required. In either case the degree will not be conferred until two type- 
written copies of the thesis have been deposited in the library and a finan- 
cial guarantee that fifty printed copies in approved form will also be de- 
posited in the library. Reprints from standard journals are acceptable 
when printed in conformity with the above rules and regulations. 

11. The Dean of the Graduate Division shall appoint for each candi- 
date an examining committee composed of five members, including the 
professors in charge of the major and minor work, the chairman of which 
shall be the professor in charge of the student's major work. The Dean 
shall also designate the time and place for the examination, which may be 
either oral or written or both, over the fields of the major and first minor. 
In case a second minor is chosen, the examinations over it may be waived 
if the candidate's standing in it is satisfactory. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

Application for admission to candidacy for a professional degree in 
Engineering should be made to the Dean of Engineering prior to the be- 
ginning of the second semester of the year in which the degree is sought. 
The requirements may be met in any one of the three following ways : 

1. Graduation from a regular four-year course in engineering, one 
year of resident study approved by the engineering faculty, at least one 
year of experience in a responsible professional position, and the prepara- 
tion of a satisfactory thesis. 

2. Graduation from a regular four-year course in engineering, at least 
five years of experience in a responsible professional position, and the 
preparation of a satisfactory thesis. 

3. Graduation from a regular five-year course in engineering, at least 
one year of successful professional experience, and the preparation of a 
satisfactory thesis. 

In Agriculture and Engineering the requirements for the degree of 
Agricultural Engineer are the same as those for the professional degrees 
in agriculture and engineering, and the candidate must be recommended 
by the faculties of both the Agricultural and Engineering Divisions. 

In Agriculture the professional degree of Master of Agriculture is 
granted on the initiative of the faculty of the Division of Agriculture. 
The completion of a standard collegiate course in agriculture followed by 
not less than five years of eminently successful experience in some phase 
of practical or professional agriculture, and the presentation of an ac- 
ceptable thesis are prerequisite. 

It is the policy of the College to confer professional degrees only in 
cases of superior professional attainments, and then only on those who are 
present at Commencement. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 21 

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

For the promotion of graduate study and research the Board of Edu- 
cation has established at Iowa State College a number of fellowships and 
scholarships. Application blanks may b" obtained from the Dean of the 
Graduate Division, and when filled out suould be filed in his office. 

Scholarships are given to holders of a baccalaureate degree and carry 
with them a stipend of two hundred dollars payable in ten equal payments 
with the remission of tuition. All scholars pay a two dollar hospital fee, 
a fee of one dollar for each hour's work up to seven hours, and laboratory 
fees in their minor subjects only. Scholars are required to do at least 
three hours teaching a week or the equivalent. 

Teaching Fellowships are open to graduates of approved institutions 
and carry with them a stipend of four hundred dollars with the remission 
of tuition. Teaching Fellows are required to do at least five hours of 
teaching a week or its equivalent. The fees for Fellows are the same as 
those for Scholars. 

Junior and Senior Research Fellowships are open to graduates of ap- 
proved institutions and have for their object the encouragement of research 
work. Junior Research Fellowships may be held during the first year of 
graduate study and carry with them a stipend of three hundred dollars 
with the remission of tuition. Senior Research Fellowships carry with 
them a stipend of five hundred dollars and are ordinarily not awarded 
except to those who have had at least one year of graduate study or 
research experience. Research Fellows in the experiment stations shall 
observe experiment station hours throughout the college year, except for 
the time given to minor work. The fees for all Fellows are the same as 
those for Scholars. 

Full resident credit may be given for graduate work to holders of 
scholarships, and of teaching and research fellowships. 

GRADUATE STUDY BY MEMBERS OF STAFFS 

The members of the instructional and investigational force of the rank 
of instructor or assistant are permitted to do graduate work. Those on 
half-time employment may receive not to exceed two-thirds time credit, 
and those on full time may receive not to exceed one-fourth time credit. 
All adjustments as to the amount of credit to be allowed shall be made 
between the Head of the Department in which the work is taken and the 
Dean of the Graduate Division. 

Members of the Experiment Station whose ranks correspond to those 
of instructors or assistants in the College may carry a limited amount 
of graduate work subject to the approval of the President. 



22 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENTS OFFERING GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 

Agricultural Education 

Professor Wilson; Associate Professors Sealock, Fisher; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Gibson 

The department offers to graduate students minor work only, except 
in special cases when major work limited to technical agricultural subjects 
may be taken. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

20. Research in Education. The field of agricultural education sup- 
plies many problems for the advanced student of education, (a) Courses 
of study in Agriculture : The organizations of Secondary Courses in 
Agriculture on a problem or vocational basis, and adapted to local condi- 
tions, (b) Vocational and Industrial Surveys : Surveys that will form 
an intelligent basis for the organization of vocational courses in agricul- 
ture and home economics. Hours by appointment. Professor Wilson 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Educational History; School Administration; Principles of Education; Development 
of Industrial High School; Rural Education; Public Education; Training in Teaching 
Home Economics ; Observation ; Training in Teaching Agriculture ; Methods of Agri- 
cultural Extension Teaching. For descriptions of these subjects see page 95 in Gen- 
eral Catalogue. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Costelloe; Associate Professor Mervine 

The department offers major work for the degree of Master of Science 
in Agricultural Engineering along the lines of farm machinery, farm 
power, drainage, irrigation, rural sanitation, and farm structures; and 
minor work for students selecting major work in other departments. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

34. Agricultural Engineering. Advanced work in drainage, irriga- 
tion, farm structures, farm power, or farm machinery. Ample facilities 
are available for advanced study and research. Credit as arranged. 

Professor Costeleoe and Associate Professor Mervine 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Farm Machinery; Farm Motors; Rural Sanitation; Farm Structures; Drainage 
Engineering; Irrigation; Gas Engines and Tractors. 

For descriptions of these subjects see page 104 of General Catalogue. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Agricultural Engineer see page 
20. 

Animal Husbandry 

Professors Pew, Turpin ; Associate Professors Vaughan, Lloyd-Jones, 

Shearer, Ferrin, Ikeler; Assistant Chief Evvard; 

Assistant Professor Gillette 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's degree 



GRADUATE DIVISION 23 

along the lines of animal nutrition and feeding, animal breeding, live stock 
management, dairy husbandry, and poultry husbandry, and major and 
mim>r work for the Doctor's degree along the lines of nutrition, genetics, 
and dairy husbandry. 

The student who enters upon graduate work in animal husbandry must 
have, in addition to a Bachelor's degree, a general knowledge of zoology, 
inorganic and organic chemistry, and he must be qualified by training to 
undertake the special line of work which he elects. The major work must 
be selected from one of the above lines and a suitable thesis written. 
Minor subjects may be elected in this or another department. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

65. Research in Animal Breeding. Heredity and its related prob- 
lems offer a large field for experimental research. Credit 3 to 10 hours per 
semester. Associate Professor Leoyd- Jones 

66. Advanced Animal Nutrition. Feeding, care, and management 
of live stock; especial emphasis being placed on the study of experimental 
methods and of research work previously done. Practical and funda- 
mental problems will be worked out. Practical laboratories and lectures 
are given. Credit 3 to 10 hours per semester. 

Professor Pew; Associate Professors Ikeeer, Shearer, Eward 

67. Research in Dairy Husbandry. Advanced study of the dairy 
breeds ; milk production and herd management. Credit 3 to 10 hours per 
semester. Assistant Professor Gieeette 

68. Research in Poultry Husbandry. Incubation, brooding, feeding, 
breeding, marketing and study of the principles and practices of successful 
management of flocks. Credit 3 to 10 hours per semester. 

Professor Turpi n 
70. Problems of Heredity and Breeding. Seminar. Weekly con- 
ferences in which current work in the experimental study of heredity and 
special topics are discussed. Credit 1 hour per semester. 

Associate Professor Leoyd- Jones 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Studies in Live Stock Production, Feeding, Management, and Judging; studies in 
Milk and Wool Production; Herd Book Study; Animal Nutrition; Market and Breed- 
ing Types of Poultry; Genetics. For descriptions of these subjects see page 118 of 
General Catalogue. 

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING AND RURAL 
STRUCTURES 

Professor Allen Homes Kimball 

The department offers major and minor work leading to the degree of 
Master of Science in Architectural Engineering. 

subjects for graduates 

1038. Advanced Design. Advanced work in industrial and rural 
building practice ; special advanced work in steel, masonry, and frame 



24 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

building construction. Open for major or minor subjects. Details of 
classification specially arranged. Professor Kimball 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Special Interior Design ; Advanced Design ; Seminars ; Elements of Architecture ; 
History of Architecture; Industrial Structures; Sanitation of Buildings; Estimating; 
Elements of Contracting; Rural Design. For description see page 126 in General 
Catalogue. 

Bacteriology and Hygiene 

Professors Buchanan, Brown, Hammer; Associate Professor Murray, 
Assistant Professor Levine 

Major and minor work leading to the degrees of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy are offered in those phases of bacteriology which 
have important relations to agriculture, home economics, engineering, vet- 
erinary medicine, and the industries. 

The student who elects his major in any field of bacteriology should 
present undergraduate credits in organic chemistry, one semester of phys- 
ics, the equivalent of Course 1 in Bacteriology, and an elementary course 
in the line in which he expects to major. Ordinarily a student must do 
two-thirds of his work in one of the lines of bacteriology above mentioned. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

30. Research in General Systematic Bacteriology. For graduate 
students. Either Sent. Prerequisites I and 5 or equivalent; fee $5.00. 

Professor Buchanan 

70. Immunity and Serum Therapy. Continuation of 61 for grad- 
uate students. Recitations, assigned readings, conferences, and labora- 
tories as arranged; credit 3; fee $5.00. Associate Professor Murray 

71. Pathogenic Bacteriology, Continuation of 50 for graduate stu- 
dents. Recitations, assigned readings, conferences, and laboratories as ar- 
ranged; credit 3; fee $5.00. Associate Professor Murray 

72. Research in Pathogenic Bacteriology. For graduate students. 
Either Scm. Prerequisites 1 and 60 or equivalent; fee $5.00. 

Professor Buchanan or Associate Professor Murray 
141. Research in Dairy Bacteriology. For graduate students. 
Either Sem. Prerequisite 101. Professor Hammer 

171. Research in Sanitary Bacteriology or Hygiene. For graduate 
students. Either Scm. Prerequisites 1 and 155 or equivalent; fee $5.00. 

Assistant Professor Levine 

231. Research in Soil Bacteriology. Same as Soils 231. Bacterial 
activities in the soil. Field, greenhouse, or laboratory experiments. The 
classification of soil bacteria. Molds, protozoa, and higher bacteria; oc- 
currence and action in soils. General study of the relation of soil organ- 
isms to fertility. Either Sem. Prerequisite 201; credit 5 or 10; fee $5.00. 

Professor Brown 

232. Conference in Soil Bacteriology. Same as Soils 232. Reports 
and discussion on current investigations. Either Sem. Professor Brown 



GRADUATE DIVISION 25 

260. Research in Household Bacteriology. For graduate students. 
Credit as arranged. Professor Buchanan 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Agricultural Bacteriology; Advanced Agricultural Bacteriology; Seminars; Veter- 
inary Pathogenic Bacteriology; Immunity and Serum Therapy; Zymotechnique and 
Household Bacteriology; Dairy Bacteriology; Industrial Sanitary Bacteriology. For 
descriptions of these subjects see page 132 in the General Catalogue. 

Botany 

Professor Pammel; Associate Professors Martin, Melhus ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Bakke ; Instructor Hayden 

The department offers major and minor work for the degrees, Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in those fields of Botany which find 
their application in agriculture, horticulture, forestry, and the industries. 
For this purpose graduate and research work in vegetable pathology, 
morphology, physiology, systematic and economic botany are offered. 

Some of the research work receiving special attention at this time is 
alfalfa and clover pollination studies, the distribution of forest trees, 
transpiration of plants, honey plants of Iowa, rust investigations, fusarium 
disease of corn, crown gall, cabbage yellows, clover anl alfalfa diseases, 
and corn root moulds. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

103. Cytology. How to kill, imbed, section, and stain material; a 
knowledge of the various stages in the development of the pistils and 
stamens of flowers; the investigation of some problems which will give 
skill in the use of the above processes. Either Sem. Prerequisites 161, 
127, 268; recitations 2 or 4; labs. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 5 or 10; fee $3.00 to 
$5.00. Associate Professor Martin 

119. Morphology of Farm Crops. Root, stem, seed, and floral struc- 
tures of corn, wheat, oats, clover, alfalfa, etc. Designed for students in- 
terested in problems of plant breeding, lodging of grains, sterility of plants, 
and developement of seed coats as related to the germination of seeds. 
Fall Sem. Prerequisite 103 or 105; recitation 1 ; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit &/$; 
fee $2.00. Associate Professor Martin 

193. General Morphology. Especially in development and embryo- 
geny. Anatomy of seeds or some special organs of plants. Hither Sem. 
Prerequisitee 161, 124; recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2 2 /^; fee $2.00. 

Associate Professor Martin 

194. Advanced Course in Thallophytes. The morphology of some 
particular group of lower forms. Either Sem. Prerequisite 268 or 189; 
recitations 2 or 4; labs. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 5 or 10; fee $3.00 or $5.00. 

Miss Hayden 

195. Advanced Morphology of the Flowering Plants. .Either Sem. 
Prerequisites 268 and 189 , and Zool. 16, 46, or 52, and Bad. 1 ; recitations 
2 or 4; lab. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 5 or 10; fee $3.00 or $5.00. 

Associate Professor Martin 



26 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

291. Plant Chemics. Growth and movement. Continuation of 290. 
6th or 8th Sent. Prerequisite 290; recitation 3; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 5; fee 
$5.00. Assistant Professor Bakke 

292. Physiology. Specific problems in plant chemics, plant physics, 
or growth and movement. Either Sent. Prerequisites 268, Chem. 351, 
Phys. 205, Bad. 1; recitation 1; labs. 2 or 4, 3 hrs.; credit 3 or 5; fee 
$3.00 or $5.00. Assistant Professor Bakke 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

304. Plant Pathology. Specific problems in the diseases of plants. 
Either Sem. Prerequisites 161, or 127, 128, 470, 189, 366, 268, Bad. 1, 
Zool. 2, 3, 304; recitations 2 or 4; labs. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 5 or 10; fee 
$3.00 or $5.00. Associate Professor Meehus 

309. Advanced Plant Pathology. Cultural, physiological, histological 
and cytological technique as employed in plant pathology. Laboratory 
practice in isolation of parasites, germination, inoculation, and carrying 
stock cultures of plant parasites on the living host in the greenhouse. 
8th Sem. Prerequisites 308, 365, or 366; recitation 1; labs. 2, 3 hr.; 
credit 3; fee $5.00. Associate Professor Meehus 

310. Disease Control. Principles and practice of disease control. 
Includes discussion of exclusion, eradication, protection by fungicides, 
and methods of selection for disease resistance. The composition, prepara- 
tion, and methods of application of fungicides and their action on host and 
parasite. 8th Sent. Prerequisite 308, 365, or 366; recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 
hr.; credit 2; fee $4.00. Associate Professor Meehus 

496a. Research Systematic Botany. Flowering plants or thallo- 
phytes, especially plants of economic importance and those in some way 
related to agricultural and horticultural problems. Either Sem. Prere- 
quisites 161, 127, 128, 189, or 268, Zool. 2, 3, Bad. 1; recitations 2 or 4; 
labs. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 5 or 10; fee $3.00 or $5.00. Professor PammEe 

496b. Advanced Conference in Systematic Botany. Some special 
group of spermatophytes. 7th Sem. Prerequisites 161 or 127, and 470; 
recitation 1; lab. 6 hrs.; credit 3; fee $3.00. Professor PammEl 

498. Advanced Mycology. Some specific group of the fungi. Either 
Sem. Prerequisite 497; recitation 1; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $4.00. 

Associate Professor Melhus 

economic botany 

500. Seed Testing. Impurities of seeds and adulterations, as well 
as the structures of the seeds. Either Sem. Prerequisites 161, 127, 128, 
470, or 560; recitations 2 or 4; labs. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 5 or 10; fee $3.00 
or $5.00. Professor Pammee 

501. Poisonous Plants. For those pursuing some minor work in 
chemistry, and those who have some knowledge of general bacteriology. 
Either Sem. Prerequisites 161, 109, 470, 516, 268, Chem. 104, 351, Bad. 1, 
Vet. Phys. 322, 634, 527; recitations 2 or 4; labs. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 5 or 
10; fee $3.00 or $5.00. Professor Pammee 



GRADUATE DIVISION 27 

597. Applied Botany. Food plants of man, their economic uses, and 
their distribution with reference to climatic conditions. Either Sem. Pre- 
requisites 161, 127, 128, 470, or 366, Econ. no, Hist. 20; recitations 2 or 4; 
labs. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 5 or 10; fee $3.00 or $5.00. 

Professor Pammel, Miss Hayden 

599. Microscopial Examination of Foods. Particular forms of food 
from a microscopical standpoint. Either Sem. Prerequisites 161, or 127 
or 128, Chcm. 352, 353, 303; recitations 2 or 4; labs. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 5 
or 10; fee $3.00 or $5.00. Professor Pammel 

HISTORY, SEMINAR, AND THESIS 

602. Thesis. A thesis embodying the results of some special work 
must be presented four weeks before the close of the year. Candidates 
in major and minor work must be generally well informed on botanical 
subjects and should be familiar with botanical literature. Credit 5 or 10; 
fee $5.00. Professor Pammee; Associate Professors Martin, Meehus 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Plant Embryogeny ; Botany of Weeds ; Evolution of Plants ; General and Experi- 
mental Morphology ; Methods of Histology ; Cytology and Methods of Histology ; Fungi ; 
Physiology, Ecology, Agrostology; Systematic Botany; Dendrology; Mycology; Plant 
Pathology ; Range and Poisonous Plants ; Botanical Seminars ; Microscopical Exam- 
ination of Foods; Seed Testing; Poisonous Plants; Pathological Physiology; Economic 
Botany. For descriptions see page 138 of General Catalogue. 

Ceramics 
Professors Beyer, Staley; Assistant Professor Galpin 

The department offers major and minor work for the degree of Master 
of Science along the lines of ceramic technology of crude and fine clay 
products, the technology of glass and enamel making, the geology of clays 
and ceramic materials, microscopic study of clays, and ceramic materials 
and cement making. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

912. Advanced Ceramic Technology. Research problems in manu- 
facture of crude and fine clay products and wares; investigations of glass 
making and enameling; geology of clays and other ceramic materials; 
microscopic study of raw ceramic materials and finished products ; special 
problems in manufacture of artificial cements. Special ceramics building 
and laboratories established by the legislature on demand of the clay in- 
dustries of the state, provide complete equipment for such advanced work. 
The Iowa field offers excellent opportunities for highly trained ceramic 
engineers. Open for major or minor subjects. Details of classification 
specially arranged for the individual student. Proper fees charged for 
laboratory work chosen. 

Professors Beyer, Staley; Assistant Professor Gaepin 

1014. Advanced Ceramic Technology. Continuation of 912. Credit 
as arranged. Professor Staley and Assistant Professor Galpin 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Application of Physical Chemistry to the Silicate Industries; Ceramics; Thesis; 
Handmade Pottery; Special Problems in Ceramic Technology; and Advanced Special 
Problems in Ceramic Technology. For descriptions see page 150 in General Catalogue. 

For the professional degree of Ceramic Engineer see page 20. 



28 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Chemical Engineering 

Professors Beyer, Coover; Associate Professor Mann 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's degree 
in any of the different lines of work in chemical engineering. 

The Chemical and Engineering Departments are provided with facil- 
ities for investigation of manufacturing problems and for conducting in- 
dustrial research according to a practical system of cooperation between 
science and industry. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

Research in Manufacturing Problems. 2 to 4 credits. 

Associate Professor Mann 
Research in Applied Electrochemistry. 3 to 5 credits. 

Associate Professor Mann 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Municipal Chemistry; Chemical Machinery; Industrial Chemistry; Applied Electro- 
chemistry; Chemical Manufacture; Chemistry of Manufacture of Foods. For descrip- 
tions of these subjects see page 165 in General Catalogue. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Chemical Engineer see page 20. 

Chemistry 

College Department Staff: Professor Coover; Associate Professors Fow- 
ler, Test, Wilkinson, Renshaw, Mann ; Assistant Professors 
Buchanan, Brown. Agricultural Experiment Station 
Staff: Chief Dox, Engineering Experi- 
ment Station Staff: Chief Coye. 

The Department of Chemistry offers major and minor work for the 
Master's and Doctor's degrees in those fields of chemistry applicable to 
agriculture, engineering, heme economics, veterinary medicine, and the in- 
dustries. 

In the Agricultural Experiment Station thesis work is offered in agri- 
cultural and biological chemistry. In the Engineering Experiment Station 
thesis work is offered in industrial chemistry and the chemistry of road 
materials. 

subjects for graduates 

121. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Selected topics: atomic 
theory, periodic-law, theories of valency, reactions in non-aqueous solvents, 
etc. Laboratory work : special methods illustrated by the preparation of 
typical substances. Lectures or laboratory may be taken separately. Fall 
Sem. Prerequisite, 205 as parallel; lectures 3; lab. 3, 3 hr.; credit 3 or 6; 
deposit $10.00 if laboratory is taken. Associate Professor Test 

122. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Continuation of 121. Lectures 
or laboratory may be taken separately. Spring Scm. Prerequisite 205; 
lectures 3; lab. 3, 3 hr.; credit 3 or 6; deposit $10.00 if laboratory is taken. 

Associate Professor Test 



GRADUATE DIVISION 29 

215. Advanced Applied Physical Chemisry. Special topics. A dis- 
cussion of chemistry of industrial processes based upon the phase rule 
and the theorem of LeChatelier. Lectures, conferences, and laboratory 
work. Lectures may be taken without laboratory. Fall Sem. Prere- 
quisite 208 ; lectures 2; labs. 3, 3 hr.; credit 2 or 5; deposit $10.00 if labora- 
tory is taken. Associate Professor Wilkinson 

216. Advanced Applied Physical Chemistry. Continuation of 215. 
Spring Sem. Lectures 2; labs. 3, 3 hr.; credit 2 or 5; deposit $10.00 if 
laboratory is taken. Associate Professor Wilkinson 

163. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. A systematic study of quan- 
titative separations including the rarer elements. 5th Sem. Prerequisite 
162; lectures 1; labs. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 4 or 7; deposit $10.00. 

Associate Professor Wilkinson 

164. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Continuation of 163. 6th 
Sem. Lectures 1; labs. 3 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 4 or 7; deposit $10.00. 

Associate Professor Wilkinson 

267. Critical Study of Methods and Apparatus for the Preparation 
of Carbon Compounds. Extraction, distillation, filtration, etc. Ap- 
paratus designing, reduction, oxidation, nitronation, sulfonation, esterifi- 
cation, etc. 5th Sem. Prerequisite 252; lectures and demonstrations 2; 
credit 2. Associate Professor Renshaw 

268. Special Topics in Applied Organic Chemistry. Three or more 
topics selected from the following; theories of reactions, the carbohydrates, 
proteins, terpenes, heterocyclic compounds, alkaloids, and dyestuffs. 6th 
Sem. Prerequisite 252; lectures 2; credit 2. 

Associate Professor Renshaw 

271. Advanced Applied Organic Chemistry. A laboratory study in 
the synthesis and preparation of a number of carbon compounds of interest 
in the arts and industries, including dyestuffs, perfumes, and drugs. Oppor- 
tunity will be given for gaining experience in a variety of laboratory 
methods. Fall Sem. Prerequisite 252; labs. 3 to 5, 3 hr.; credit 3 to 5; 
deposit $10.00. Associate Professor Renshaw 

272. Advanced Applied Organic Chemistry. Continuation of 271. 
Spring Sem. Prerequisite 265; labs. 3 to 5, 3 hr.; credit 3 to 5; deposit 
$10.00. Associate Professor Renshaw 

303. Food Analysis. Methods of analysis of animal and vegetable 
foods, including tests for adulterants, preservatives, and coloring matters ; 
and methods of organic analysis. A discussion of food legislation and 
standards of purity. 5th or 6th Sem. Prerequisite 352 or 376; lectures 2; 
labs. i J / 2 or 4 l / 2 , 2 hr.; credit 3 or 5; deposit $7.50 or $10.00. 

Professor Coover and Assistant Professor Buchanan 

304. Advanced Food Analysis. Continuation of 303. 6th Sem. Pre- 
requisites 303 and 252; lectures 2; labs. i l / 2 or 4]/ 2 , 2 hr.; credit 3 or 5; 
deposit $7.50 or $10.00. Offered in 1918-1919. 

Professor Coover and Assistant Professor Buchanan 

365. Analysis of Soils and Fertilizers. Designed especially for those 

students in agronomy or animal husbandry who wish to continue the work 



30 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

begun in 352 in fertilizers and soil analysis. 5th Sem. Prerequisite 352; 
lectures 2; labs. 3, 2 hr.; credit 4; deposit $10.00. 

Professor Coover and Assistant Professor Buchanan 
366. Chemistry of Soils. The most recent investigational work on 
soils. Research problems. 6th Sem. Prerequisite 162, 36$, 252; lectures 
2; lab. 5, 2 hr.; credit 5J/3; deposit $10.00 

Professor Coover and Assistant Professor Buchanan 

401. Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition. For students who de- 
sire to obtain a thorough grounding in the principles of physiological 
chemistry and nutrition. In conjunction with Chemistry 402 it covers fully 
the chemistry of digestion, assimilation, and metalbolism of the organic 
and inorganic constituents of the food, and the secretions and excretions 
of the animal body with special reference to their normal and pathological 
significance. 5th Sem. Prerequisite Organic Ckem. and Quantitative 
Analysis; lectures 3; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3 to 5; deposit $7.50. 

Associate Professor Fowler 

402. Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition. Continuation of 401. 
6th Sem. Lectures 3; labs. 2, 3 hr. or 3, 2 hr.; credit 3 to 5; deposit $7.50. 

Associate Professor Fowler 
415. Special Problems. Advanced instruction in physiological chem- 
istry along lines closely associated to dietetics, experimental veterinary 
medicine, animal nutrition, bacteriology, etc. 7th or 8th Sem. or both; 
prerequisite 402 or 420; conference 1 ; lab. 2, 3 hr. or more; credit 3 or 
more; deposit $7.50 or more. Associate Professor Fowler 

420. Metabolism and Human Nutrition. Nutrition of the human 
body with special reference to dietetic problems. 6th Sem. Prerequisite 
403; lectures 3; labs. 2, 3 hr. or 3, 2 hr.; credit 3 to 5; deposit $7.50. 

Associate Professor Fowler 
801. Research. Research work for graduate students is offered in 
the following subjects: 

a. Applied Inorganic Chemistry, Associate Professor Test and As- 
sistant Professor Brown. 

b. Analytical Chemistry, Associate Professor Wilkinson. 

c. Applied Physical Chemistry, Associate Professor Wilkinson. 

d. Applied Organic Chemistry, Associate Professor Renshaw. 

e. Organic Analysis or Food Analysis, Professor Coover and As- 
sistant Professor Buchanan. 

f. Agricultural Chemistry, Professor Coover. 

g. Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition, Associate Professor 
Fowler. 

Hither Sem. 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Applied Physical Chemistry; Electro-chemistry; Analysis of Carbon Compounds; 
Manufacture of Fine Organic Chemicals; Applied Organic Chemistry; Food Analysis; 
Dairy Chemistry ; Sanitary Chemistry; Agricultural Chemistry ; Physiological Chem- 
istry; Research in Metabolism; Industrial Chemistry; Chemical Machinery; and 
Municipal Chemistry; Textiles; Animal and Plant Chemistry. For description see 
page l r >H in General Catalogue. 



GRADUATE DIVISION 31 

Civil Engineering 

Professors Kirkham, King, Agg; Associate Professors Nichols, Crum 

The department offers major work for the degree of Master of Sci- 
ence in Civil Engineering along the lines of masonry structures and ex- 
perimental engineering, railway engineering, structural engineering, hy- 
draulic and sanitary engineering, masonry design, highway engineering; 
and minor and supporting work in the other departments of the Engineer- 
ing, Agricultural, and Industrial Science Divisions. Students may there- 
fore major in civil engineering and minor in any department of the Agri- 
cultural and Industrial Science Divisions which offers a correlated line 
of work, and vice versa. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

1108. Railway Engineering. Advanced work in railway signaling, 
railway design, railway economics, and railway administration and opera- 
tion. Professor King 

1109. Structural Engineering. Advanced work in the design of all 
types of concrete and steel structures. Proeessor Kirkham 

1110. Experimental Engineering. Advanced work in experimental 
hydraulics, concrete and concrete materials, iron and steel, and other ma- 
terials of construction. Associate Proeessor Crum 

1111. Water Supply and Sewage Disposal. Preparation of plans 
and specifications for water and sewage purification works, including neces- 
sary coordinate work in Chemistry and Bacteriology; special investiga- 
tions in cooperation with the Departments of Chemistry and Bacteriology, 
and with the Iowa State Board of Health. 

1112. Highway Engineering. The traffic census as a factor in the 
design of roads; the traffic zone as a factor in the selection of routes for 
improvement; advanced pavement design; the relation between types of 
roads and methods of financing; advanced work in bituminous and non- 
bituminous road materials testing. Proeessor Agg 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Water Purification ; Sewage Treatment and Municipal Wastes Disposal ; Elements 
of City Planning; Seminars; Water Supply; Railway Design; Railway Operation; 
Structural Engineering; Road Materials; Experimental Work in Civil Engineering; 
Masonry Design; Highway Engineering; Roads and Pavement Design; Hydraulic 
Design; Railway Engineering; Sanitary Design; Water Power; Highway Design; 
Hydrology; Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design; History, Composition and Uses of 
Concrete. For description see page 175 in General Catalogue. 

For the professional degree of Civil Engineer see page 20. 

Dairying 

Professors Mortensen, Hammer; Associate Professor Rudnick; 
Assistant Professor Hauser 

The Department of Dairying offers major and minor work for the 
Master's degree along the lines of management of dairy plants, dairy 
bacteriology, and creamery products. In correlation with the fundamental 



32 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

sciences the department also offers major and minor work for the Doctor's 
degree in management of dairy plants and dairy bacteriology. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

31. Research in Buttermaking. Cream ripening; pasteurization; 
churning and storing of butter; chemical and bacteriological changes in- 
volved in these various processes. 

Professor MortensEn, Associate Professor Rudnick 

32. Research in Ice Cream Making. Composition of ice creams, fil- 
lers, and their influences on quality and yield; homogenization, pasteuriza- 
tion, and storage of cream as related to ice cream manufacture. 

Professor MortensEn 

33. Research in Management of Dairy Plants. Economic manufac- 
ture and marketing of dairy products. Work carried on in connection 
with the college and commercial plants of the state. 

Professor MortensEn, Associate Professor Rudnick 

34. Research in Market Milk. The effect of various methods of 
handling on the quality of market milk and cream. 

Professor Hammer, Assistant Professor Hauser 
50. Conference in Dairying. Reports and discussion on current in- 
vestigations. Required of graduate students. Professor Hammer 
141. Research in Dairy Bacteriology. Same as Bact. 141. For grad- 
uate students only. Either Sem. Prerequisite ioi. Professor Hammer 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Factory Management; Fancy Ice Creams and Ices; Judging Dairy Products; Milk 
Testing and Inspection; Seminars; Market Milk; Dairy Bacteriology; Special Dairy 
Bacteriology, Ice Cream Making, Butter Making, and Creamery Management; Cheese 
Making; Thesis; Domestic Dairying; Advanced Dairy Bacteriology. For descriptions 
of these subjects see page 187 in General Catalogue. 

Economic Science 

applied economics and social science 

Professor Brindley; Associate Professors Von Tungeln and Rankin; 

Instructor Baker 

The Department of Economic Science offers major and minor work 
for the Master's degree in those fields of Economic Science applicable to 
agriculture, engineering, home economics, veterinary medicine, and the in- 
dustries. 

The different libraries of the college contain many of the best reference 
works, journals, magazines, and government publications bearing on agri- 
cultural economics, engineering economics, and rural sociology. Research 
work in rural sociology is carried on during the summer. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

45. Advanced Economic and Social Principles. Conference subject, 
primarily for graduates. loth Sem. Credit 2. 

Professor Brindeey; Associate Professors Rankin and Von Tungeln 



GRADUATE DIVISION 33 

540. Thesis. Thesis and research work that may be credited as par- 
tial requirements for advanced degrees. Directed by the members of the 
Department. 

Professor Brindley; Associate Professors Von Tungeen, Rankin 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Problems in Advanced Agricultural Economics ; Marketing of Agricultural Pro- 
ducts; Rural Sociology; Business Economics; Public Utilities; Rural Law; Veterinary 
Law; Business Law; Accounting; Statistics; Household Accounting; Advanced Ac- 
counting; Principles of Applied Sociology; Rural Sociology. For descriptions of these 
subjects see page 191 in General Catalogue. 

Electrical Engineering 

Professor Fish; Associate Professors Bartholomew, Wright; Assistant 
Professors Robbins, Paine 

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers opportunity for major 
work leading to the degree of Master of Science in Electrical Engineering. 
The subjects offered are advanced theory of alternating currents, electric 
power transmission, electric railways, and advanced work on the operat- 
ing characteristics of electrical apparatus. 

Opportunity for minor work is also given to those majoring in other 
departments of Engineering and in the departments of the Industrial Sci- 
ence and Agricultural Divisions. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

1051. Electrical Engineering. Advanced work in alternating cur- 
rents, electric railway engineering, electric power transmission, telephony, 
wireless telegraphy, and characteristics of electrical machinery. Intensive, 
study of any one of these subjects is here made possible. Suitable major 
and minor work will be arranged to suit the needs of the student. Proper 
fees charged for laboratory work chosen. 

Professor Fish; Associate Professors Bartholomew, Wright; 

Assistant Professors Robbins, Paine 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Principles of Electrical Engineering; Direct and Alternating Current Machinery; 
Seminars ; Theory of Alternating Currents ; Telephony ; Electric Railways ; Power 
Transmission; Telephone Engineering; Thesis. See page 200 in General Catalogue. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Electrical Engineer, see 
page 20. 

Farm Crops and Soils 

Professors Stevenson, Hughes, Brown; Associate Professors Smith, Pot- 
ter; Chief Burnett 

Graduate work in the department comprises investigations in the two 
general fields of soils and of farm crops. Major and minor work for the 
Master's degree is offered along the lines of crop production, crop breed- 
ing, soil physics, soil fertility, soil bacteriology, soil humus, and soil man- 
agement. For the Doctor's degree, major and minor work is offered in 
soil fertility, soil bacteriology, and soil humus. 



34 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Research problems of great value to the state are carried on in each of 
the above lines by graduate students and members of the department 
faculty. Much interest is stimulated in such research by the meetings of 
the Iowa Section of the American Society of Agronomy which is composed 
of the graduate students of the department and the department faculty. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

30. Research in Crop Production. Problems of growth and the har- 
vesting and storage of cereal crops. Either Sem. Prerequisites I, 2, 3, 33; 
credit 5 or 10 hrs. Professor Hughes 

37. Conferences in Crop Production. Reports and discussion on 
current investigations. Either Sem. Professor Hughes 

131. Research in Crop Breeding, (a) Cereal Breeding. Special 
problems with the Iowa Experiment Station, (b) Forage Crop Breeding. 
The important crops, timothy, red clover, sweet clover, and alfalfa at the 
station nurseries. (c) Methods of Investigation. Special problems. 
Either Sem. Prerequisites 13/, 138, and 139; credit 5 or 10. 

Professor Hughes 
142. Conference in Crop Breeding. Reports and discussion on cur- 
rent investigations. Either Sem. Professor Hughes 

130. Research in Soil Physics. Origin and classification of soils of 
definite areas with study of agricultural adaptation; physical character- 
istics of soils, with particular reference to moisture, temperature, mechan- 
ical analysis, and identification ; methods of investigation, with reference 
to the determination of the physical proporties of soils. Either Sem. Pre- 
requisite 121 or 141; credit 5 or 10; fee $5.00. 

Professor Brown, Associate Professor Smith, 
Assistant Professor Eastman 

131. Conference in Soil Physics. Reports and discussion on current 
investigations. Either Sem. Professor Brown. 

231. Research in Soil Bacteriology. Same as Bact. 31. Bacterial 
activities in the soil. Field, greenhouse, or laboratory experiments. The 
classification of soil bacteria, molds, protozoa, and higher bacteria; oc- 
currence and action in soils. General study of the relation of soil organ- 
isms to fertility. Either Sem. Prerequisite 201 ; credit 5 or 10; fee $5.00. 

Professor Brown 

232. Conference in Soil Bacteriology. Same as Bact. 232. Reports 
and discussion on current investigations. Either Sem. Professor Brown. 

241. Research in Soil Humus. Organic material in soils looking to 
its classification; the rate of decomposition of organic matter in soils, cor- 
relation with the state of undecomposed matter, with micro-organisms, 
and with productivity. Either Sem. Prereequisites 322 or 342 and 201; 
credit 5 or 10; fee $5.00. Professor Brown, Associate Professor Potter 

242. Conferences in Soil Humus. Reports and discussion on current 
investigations. Either Sem. Associate Professor Potter 

332. Research in Soil Fertility. Special soils, with reference to the 
physical and chemical properties and deficiencies in plant food, with ex- 



GRADUATE DIVISION 35 

periments to test the efficiency of certain treatments; relationship between 
soil composition and crop production; value of fertilizing materials, as de- 
termined by pot and plot experiments. Either Sem. Prerequisite 322 or 
342; credit 5 or 10; fee $5.00. 

Professor Brown, Associate Professor Smith, 
Assistant Professor Bancroft 
333. Conferences in Soil Fertility. Reports and discussion on cur- 
rent investivations. Either Sem. Professor Brown 

438. Research in Soil Management. The effects of certain systems 
of soil management; comparison of the past and present systems as shown 
by soil and crop conditions in different localities and under different condi- 
tions ; systems of soil management under livestock, grain, mixed or truck 
systems of farming; management of special soils, including gumbo, peat, 
alkali, and others. Either Sem. Prerequisites 121 or 141 and 322 or 342; 
credit 5 or 10. Professor Stevenson 

439. Conferences in Soil Management. Reports and discussions on 
current investigations. Either Sem. Professor Stevenson 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Corn Production ; Small Grain Production ; Small Grain and Forage Crops ; Special 
Problems in Crop Production ; Methods of Crop Investigations ; Advanced Judging ; 
Forage Crop Production ; Fiber, Sugar, and Root Crops ; Corn Breeding Small Grain 
Breeding; Forage Crop Breeding; Special Problems in Crop Breeding; Seminars; 
Soil Physics ; Physics of Forest Soils ; Forest Physiography and Soil Surveying ; 
Special Problems in Soil Physics ; Soil Bacteriology ; Special and Advanced Problems 
in Soil Bacteriology; Special and Advanced Problems in Soil Fertility; Soil Fertility; 
Soil Management; Soil Surveying and Mapping; Special and Advanced Problems in 
Soil Surveying. For descriptions of these subjects see page 211 in the General Cat- 
alogue. 

Farm Management 

Professor Munger; Assistant Chief Lloyd 

Major and minor work for the Master's degree is offered in Farm 
Management. The problems which may be pursued include farm surveys, 
cost accounting, land tenure, and farm tenancy. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

7. Research. Original investigation of a special farm management 
problem. Either Sem. Professor Munger; Assistant Chief Lwyd 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Farm Management; Advanced Farm Management; Research; Seminar. For de- 
scriptions see page 220, General Catalogue. 

Forestry 

Professors Beach, MacDonald; Associate Professor Morbeck 

The department offers major and minor work leading to the degree 
Master of Science in Forestry. Also a five-year outlined course, devel- 
oped along the lines of forest protection, forest management, lumbering, 
and forest products, and leading to the same degree, is maintained for the 



36 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

special benefit of students who, at the beginning of their Freshman year, 
decide to spend five years in the study of Forestry. Candidates for a 
higher degree, who are pursuing the five-year course, are subject to the 
rules and regulations of the Graduate Division during the fifth year of 
residence. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

42. Advanced Forest Management. Special Problems in regulation 
of yield in the forest. Construction of working plans. Assessment of 
damages to forest property. Field investigations and reports on forest 
lands within Iowa, ioth Sent. Prerequisite 9, 10, 11, 52; credit 3. 

Professor Macdonald 

43. Advanced Forest Regeneration. In connection with 42. Nursery 
methods, seeding and planting. The preparation of planting plans for 
specific areas. Methods of increasing forest productivity in native stands 
and plantations by artificial means. Field work given an important place. 
ioth Sent. Prerequisite 53; credit 2. Professor MacDonald 

44. Forestry Research. Special investigations chosen in conference 
with the Forestry faculty, ioth Sent. Credit 2 to 12. 

Professor Macdonaed 

45. Advanced Wood Structure. Special investigation for advanced 
students in the structure of wood. 8th Sent. Prerequisite 59; credit 3. 

Professor Macdonaed 

46. Grading Lumber. Origin and development of grading rules for 
lumber. Various rules employed in grading lumber in lumbering regions. 
The grading of by-products of lumber mills, ioth Sent. Prerequisites 36, 
54; credit 1. Associate Professor Morbeck 

47. Advanced Lumbering. Special investigation in logging, milling, 
transportation, and marketing forest products, ioth Sem. Prerequisites 
36, 54, and 55; credit 3. Associate Professor Morbeck 

48. Advanced Forest Protection. Injuries to forests, especially by 
fire. The preparation of fire plans. Timber protective associations and 
their work. The duty of the state toward the preservation and protection 
of the forests, ioth Sem. Prerequisite 11; recitations 3; credit 3. 

Associate Professor Morbeck 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Advanced Forest Management; Advanced Forest Regeneration; Forestry Research; 
Wood Structure; Grading Lumber; Forest Protection; Forest Valuation; Timber 
Preservation; Municipal Forestry; Economic Woods; Silviculture ; Lumbering; Forest 
Products; Forest Administration; Thesis; Seminar; State and National Forestry 
Laws; Wood Technology; Lumber Markets and Transportation. For description of 
these subjects see page 229 in General Catalogue. 

Geology 

Professor Beyer; Assistant Professor Galpin 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's degree 
along those lines in which geology has an intimate relationship to mining 
engineering, soil formation, etc. The department also offers major work 



GRADUATE DIVISION 37 

for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the fields of economic geology 
and petrology. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

25. Advanced Soils Geology. Work continued through i to 4 semes- 
ters. Credit 2 to 5 hrs. per semester as arranged. Fee $1 to $3 per 
semester. Professor Beyer 

26. Advanced Mining Geology. Work continued through 1 to 4 
semesters. Credit 2 to 5 hrs. per semester as arranged. Professor Beyer 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Advanced Geology ; Economic Geology ; Mineralogy ; Meteorology and Climatology ; 
Agricultural Geology ; Invertebrate Paleontology ; Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleo- 
Botany; Petrology; Optical and Physical Mineralogy; Petrography; Summer Field 
Work. For descriptions of these subjects see page 237 in General Catalogue. 

Home Economics 

Professor MacKay; Associate Professors Gettemy, Monsch, Brandt, 
Fisher ; Assistant Professors Humphrey, Olsen, Witwer, McNeal 

Opportunities are offered for graduate study leading to the Master's 
degree in Home Economics. The major part of the graduate work is 
offered in the fields of chemistry, bacteriology, economic science, physi- 
ology, etc., which have special application to home economics. Each stu- 
dent, therefore, chooses her major graduate work in the particular field in 
which she wishes to specialize. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

101. Nutrition Seminar. Individual study of the recent advances in 

the science of nutrition with class reports and discussions upon assigned 

topics. Hours to be arranged. Prerequisite, H. Be. 46. 

Associate Professor Monsch 
110. Textile Research. Prerequisite 42. Miss Murray 

Graduate courses in Bacteriology, Chemistry, Physiology, or Economic 

Science, etc., as related to Home Economics may constitute the major. 

These subjects are described under the respective departments in the 

General Catalogue. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Nutrition and Dietetics; Advanced Nutrition and Dietetics; Experimental Prob- 
lems in Foods; House Practice; Training in Teaching Home Economics; Demonstra- 
tions; Applied Dress Design; Advanced Millinery; Pattern Research; Economic Cloth- 
ing; Children's and Misses' Wardrobes; Costume Design; Textile Design; The House; 
History of Art-Painting; History of Art-Sculpture; History of Costume. For descrip- 
tions of these subjects see page 249 in the General Catalogue. 

Horticulture 

Professor Beach; Chiefs Erwin, Greene; Associate Professors Culley, 
Harrington; Assistant Professor Thurston 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's degree 
along the lines of general horticulture, pomology, truck crops, landscape 



38 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

gardening, and floriculture; and major and minor work for the Doctor's 
degree along the lines of plant breeding and pomology. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

58. Thesis or Research. Special topics for investigation for minor 
or major graduate work. Hours by appointment. 
Professor Beach ; Associate Professor CullEy ; Chiefs Erwin, Greene 
152. Thesis or Research. Special topics for investigation for major 
or minor graduate work. Hours by appointment. 

Professor Beach ; Associate Professor Harrington ; Chief Greene 
252. Thesis or Research. Special topics for investigation for major 
or minor graduate work. Hours by appointment. 

Assistant Professor Thurston ; Chief Erwin 
352. Thesis or Research. Special topics for investigation for major 
or minor graduate work. Hours by appointment. 

Assistant Professor Thurston ; Chief Erwin 

452. Thesis. Special topics for investigation for major or minor 

graduate work. Hours by appointment. Associate Professor Culeey 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Plant Genetics; Markets and Marketing; Plant Breeding; Fruit Farm Manage- 
ment; Advanced Pomology; Greenhouse Management; Market Gardening; Truck Farm 
Management; History of Landscape Gardening; City Planning; Maintenance and 
Construction; Shade and Street Tree Management; Landscape Design; Civic Design; 
Planting Plans. For descriptions of these subjects see page 264 in the General Cat- 
alogue. 

Mathematics 

Professors Stanton, Roberts; Associate Professors Colpitts, Pattengill, 
Chaney, Snedecor; Dr. Tappan 

Major and minor work for the degree of Master of Science is offered 
by the department. Special courses in advanced mathematics of engineer- 
ing, physics, economic problems, statistics, and biological problems are 
so correlated with the technical lines of work as to demand consideration 
of all students who expect to teach applied mathematics in technical in- 
stitutions or to become investigators in any of the above lines of work. 

subjects for graduates 

55. The Theory of Functions of the Complex Variable. Introduc- 
tory. Complex numbers and their geometrical representations ; conformal 
representation, and analytic functions of a complex variable. 5th, 6th, 7th, 
or 8th Scm.. Lectures and recitations 3, or throughout the year; credit 3 
to 6. Associate Professor Colpitts 

77. Advanced Dynamics. Critical treatment of the laws of motion, 
particular motions of a material point, work and energy; principle of 
least action; generalized equations of motion; dynamics of rigid, rotating, 
and deformable bodies; the theory of potential and hydrodynamics. Pre- 
requisites 58, 73; lectures and recitations 3 or throughout the year; credit 3 
to 6. Associate Professor Chaney 



GRADUATE DIVISION 39 

79. Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics. A critical 
treatment of the equations of Bessel, Laplace, Poisson, Legendre, Fourier, 
and of Lagrange's equations of motion, with application to certain boun- 
dary value problems of physics. Prerequisite 58; lectures and recitations 
|; credit 3. Associate Professor Chaney 

82. Introduction to the Mathematical Theory of Electricity and 
Magnetism. A treatment of electrostatics and current electricity, mag- 
netostatics and electrodynamics from the mathematical standpoint. Pre- 
requisites 38, 73; 3 hours for one semester, or 2 hours for the year; credit 
3 or 4. Associate Professor Chaney 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Theory of Equations; Determinants and Advanced Analytic Geometry; Advanced 
Spherical Trigonometry ; History of Mathematics ; Advanced Differential and Integral 
Calculus; Differential Equations; Projective Geometry; Higher Algebra; Infinite 
Series ; Mathematical Theory of Statistics ; Mathematics as Applied to Economic Prob- 
lems; Theoretical Mechanics; Theory and Applications of Vector Analysis. For de- 
scriptions of these subjects see page 279 in the General Catalogue. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Professor Meeker; Associate Professors Cleghorn, Major, Norman, 

Leavell 

The department offers major work for the degree of Master of Science 
in Mechanical Engineering along the lines of gas engineering, steam en- 
gineering, heating and ventilation, machine designing, railway mechanical 
engineering, automobile engineering; and minor and supporting work in 
the other departments of the Engineering, Agricultural, and Industrial 
Science Divisions. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

1051. Railway Mechanical Engineering. Special advanced studies in 
car construction and design; study of design and operation of air brakes, 
together with theory of braking and the application to operation of trains; 
locomotive design, operation, and tests; railway shop design and manage- 
ment; railway hydraulic and pneumatic machinery; and special independ- 
ent research of the many problems of railway mechanical engineering. 
The completion and equipment of the Transportation Building, with its 
locomotive testing laboratory, affords excellent opportunities for advanced 
research and graduate study along this important line. The Chicago and 
Northwestern Railway Company is cooperating fully with the College in 
work of this nature. Open for major or minor subjects. Fees for lab- 
oratory work will be specially arranged. 

Professors Meeker, Norman, Ceeghorn 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Mechanics of Engineering; Hydraulics; Heating Design; Machine Work; Sem- 
inars; Machine Design; Steam Engines and Boilers; Power Plant Engineering; Steam 
and Gas Laboratory; Crane Design; Gas Engine Construction and Operation; Gas 
Engine Design ; Power Engineering. For descriptions see page 293 in General Cat- 
alogue.. 

For the requirements for the professional degree of Mechanical Engineering, see 
page 20. 



40 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Mining Engineering 

Professor Beyer; Associate Professor Hodson 

All of the subjects offered are required of undergraduates who spe- 
cialize in Mining Engineering and Metallurgy, but may be elected for 
minor work by graduates who are majoring along other lines. The de- 
partment does not, at the present time, offer major work for an advanced 
degree. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Principles of Mining; Metallurgy; Mining Engineering; Advanced Metallurgy; 
Mine Administration; Mining Law; Seminar. For descriptions of these subjects see 
page 308 in General Catalogue. For the requirements of the professional degree of 
Mining Engineer see page 20. 

Physics 

Professor Spinney; Associate Professors Stiles, Thompson, Kunerth ; 
Assistant Professor Plagge 

The Department of Physics offers major and minor work leading to 
the degree of Master of Science in those fields of physics which are re- 
lated to industrial science, engineering, home economics, and agriculture. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

1041. Theory of Heat. 

1042. Wave Motion and Sound. 

1043. Theory of Light. 

1044. Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. 

1045. Research. 

1046. Research. 

1047. Physics Seminar. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATFS AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Physical Laboratory ; Sound; Advanced Physical Laboratory; Advanced Course in 
Heat; Advanced Course in Light; Industrial Physics; Theory of Illumination; Photog- 
raphy ; Methods of Observation and Theory of Measurements ; Wave Motion and 
Sound; Electricity and Magnetism; Electron Theory and R?dio Activity; History of 
Physics ; Theory of Illumination ; Thesis. For description of these subjects see page 
321 in General Catalogue. 

Veterinary Anatomy 

Professor Howard Sylvester Murphey 

Major and minor work for the degree of Master of Science is offered 
by the department in histology and in gross anatomy. Minor work in 
anatomy is suggested for students majoring in animal nutrition, biological 
chemistry, pathology, physiology, and zoology. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

1010. Research in Anatomy. Problems of importance relative to 
Animal Husbandry, Veterinary Physiology, Pathology, or Surgery. An- 
atomical problems of a systemic, topographic, or comparative nature. Lab. 
3 or 4; credit 3 or 4. Professor Murphey 



GRADUATE DIVISION 41 

1011. Research in Microscopic Anatomy. Physiological histology; 
comporative work dealing with problems of importance to pathology, or 
with anatomical problems relating to histogenesis or morphology. 

Professor Murphey 

subjects eor graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Osteology and Arthrology; Myology and Splanchnology of the Horse; Myology, 
Angiology, Neurology; Comparative Anatomy; Microscopy and Microscopic Anatomy; 
Microscopic Anatomy of the Organs of the Domestic Animals; Applied Topographic 
(Surgical and Clinical) Anatomy. For descriptions see page 330 in General Cat- 
alogue. 

NOTi: 101, 202, 303, 404, 133, and 234 are offered as graduate sxibjects to An- 
imal Husbandry and Industrial Science students. 

Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology 

Professor Dimock; Associate Professor Murray 

The department offers major and minor work leading to the Master's 
degree along the lines of systemic pathology, the pathology of specific 
infectious diseases, the pathology of sporadic diseases, tumors, chemical 
pathology, veterinary bacteriology, immunity and serum therapy. 

Students who major in veterinary bacteriology including immunity and 
serum therapy will classify with the Department of Bacteriology in the 
Industrial Science Division, but will do their work in the Department of 
Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology. Students who major in pathology 
will classify in the Department of Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

1020. Research in Pathology, (a) Systemic pathology, (b) The 
pathology of specific infectious diseases, (c) The pathology of sporadic 
diseases, (d) Tumors, (e) Chemical pathology. Prerequisites 350 and 
536 or their equivalent. Professor Dimock 

1025. Research in Bacteriology, (a) Veterinary bacteriology, (b) 
Immunity, (c) Serum therapy. Prerequisite 330 or its equivalent. 

Associate Professor Murray 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

General Pathology; Special Pathology; Advanced Pathology; Immunity and Serum 
Therapy; Laboratory in Immunity and Serum Therapy; Milk Hygiene. For descrip- 
tions see page 333 in General Catalogue. 

Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology 
Professor Henry Dale Bergman 

The department offers major work for the Master's degree along lines 
of investigation of physiological subjects relative to veterinary science; 
and minor and supporting work in physiology for graduate students in 
the Industrial Science Division or for agricultural students who are doing 
their major work along such lines as general nutrition, production prob- 
lems, feeding, breeding, etc. 

Students who major in physiology for an advanced degree must have 



42 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

had such previous training in physiology, and related subjects, such as 
anatomy, histology, chemistry, etc., as will permit of advanced study. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

1001. Comparative Physiology. Minor graduate work especially ar- 
ranged to meet the needs of graduate students in agriculture, doing their 
major work along such lines as general nutrition, meat or milk production 
problems, animal feeding, breeding, etc. The work may be selected and 
the laboratory and time requirements arranged by consultation with the 
head of the department, ist Sem. Professor Bergman 

1002. Comparative Physiology. Continuation of 1001, including con- 
siderable individual conference work, and biweekly meetings of graduate 
students to discuss especially assigned topics. 2nd Sem. 

Professor Bergman 
1005. Research in Physiology. An opportunity for investigation work 
in physiological subjects relative to veterinary science is offered to a 
limited number of students who have had such prerequisite work as may 
be essential to its pursuance. The selection of work and the amount of 
time required are arranged, in each case, by consultation with the head of 
the department. Professor Bergman 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Comparative Physiology; Advanced Comparative Physiology; Seminar. For de- 
scriptions of these subjects see page 335 in General Catalogue. 

Zoology 

Professor Summers ; Associate Professors Guthrie, Bartholomew, Ewing , 
Assistant Professors Harrison, Scullen 

The department offers major and minor work for the Master's degree 
along the lines of entomology, comparative physiology, invertebrate and 
vertebrate comparative anatomy; and major work for the Doctor's degree 
along the lines of entomology and comparative physiology. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

64. Research in Zoology. Investigation in some zoological subject 
suitable for a thesis. The prerequisites and the selection of the work 
and the amount of time required will be in each case determined by con- 
sultation with the head of the department. Both Sems. Deposit $3.00. 

Associate Professor Guthrie 

151. Research in Physiology. Investigations in some physiological 
subject suitable for a thesis. The prerequisites and the selection of work 
and the amount of time required will be determined in each case by con- 
sultation with person in charge of work. Both Sems. Fee $3.00. 

Assistant Professor ScuelEn 

248. Research in Embryology. Investigation of some problems in 
development suitable for presentation as a thesis. The prerequisites and 



GRADUATE DIVISION 43 

the selection of work and the amount of time required will be determined 
in each case by consultation with the head of the department. 

Associate Professor Guthrie 
356. Advanced Research in Entomology. Preparation of master's 
in entomology or parasitology. Both Sems. Prerequisite 355; labs, 
time arranged ; credit according to lab. schedule; deposit $5.00. 

Associate Professor Ewing 

subjects for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

Evolution of Animals; Vertebrate Comparative Anatomy; Morphology; Advanced 
Invertebrate Comparative Anatomy; Advanced Entomology; Neurology; Economic 
Entomology: Orchard and Nursery Inspection; Literature of Entomology; Compara- 
tive Physiology, and Embryology; Elementary Research in Entomology; Advanced 
Research in Entomology; Greenhouse and Truck Crop Pests; Histology and Histolog- 
ical Technique. For descriptions see page 344 in General Catalogue. 

DEPARTMENTS OFFERING MINOR WORK ONLY 

The work in the following departments is undergraduate in character 
and is subordinate and auxiliary to the work of the departments which 
offer major lines. 

History 

Professor Cessna; Associate Professor Schmidt; Instructor Arragon 

Students majoring for advanced degrees in agriculture or industrial 
science or applied economics and social science may minor in history. 
The chief purpose of this work is to furnish an historical foundation for 
the study of the present day economic and social problems in technical 
fields. The new trend in historical science has brought the study of his- 
tory into a very fundamental relation to the industrial sciences. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES 

50. Economic History of the United States, 1860-1880. Economic 
causes, problems, and effects of the Civil War; the public lands; agricul- 
ture, manufacturing, and mining; internal trade and transportation; for- 
eign commerce and shipping; banking, currency, and tariff legislation; and 
foreign complications. Special attention given to the history of the 
Granger movement in its economic and political aspects, yth Sem. Reci- 
tations 3; credit 3. Associate Professor Schmidt 

76. Economic History of Agriculture in Iowa. Economic resources; 
early trade and exploration; Indian tribes and land cessions; pioneer pop- 
ulation and agriculture ; growth of markets ; transportation ; development 
of specialized and diversified farming; land tenure; agricultural labor; 
use of improved farm machinery. Attention also given to the sources of 
immigration; the type of farmers; methods of agriculture; currency and 
banking; relation of the farming class to national monetary legislation 
and the tariff; the relation of the State to agriculture; and an historical 
and comparative analysis of present day agrarian problems, gth Sem. 
Recitations 2; credit 2. Associate Professor Schmidt 



44 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

98. Research in Economic History, gth or 10 Sem. Credit 2 to 6 
hours. Associate Professor Schmidt; Instructor Arragon 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Economic History of American Agriculture; History of the United States as a 
World Power; Tariff History of the United States; Economic History of Modern 
Europe; Economic History of English Agriculture; History of Labor Problems in the 
United States ; History of Domestic Commerce ; Comparative European Government ; 
American Government and Politics. For descriptions of these subjects see page 240 
in General Catalogue. 

Psychology 

Professor Cessna ; Associate Professor Vance 

Students majoring for advanced degrees in agriculture or industrial 
science or applied economics and social science may minor in psychology. 
It is evident that all subjects involving the human element must be based 
on the knowledge of the laws of mental action. The study of psychology 
is regarded as necessary to the proper understanding of such problems as 
industrial development and efficiency, rural social uplift, etc. 

SUBJECTS FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Ethics; Social Psychology; Psychology of Business; The Animal Mind; Social and 
Ethical Institutions of Bible Times; Social and Ethical Teachings of Jesus. 
Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence; Educational Phychology. 
For descriptions of these subjects see page 324 in the General Catalogue. 



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